USSSP: A Scout's Duty to God and Country
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JEWISH

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YOUTH EMBLEMS: RESOURCE PACKET NO.

TIGER CUBS Maccabee S7165, C3933

CUB SCOUTS Maccabee/Aleph S3184

WEBELOS SCOUTS Aleph S3184

BOY SCOUTS Ner Tamid S3182

SCOUTS/VENTURERS (14 & OLDER) Etz Chaim

SCHOLARSHIP:

National Jewish Committee on Scouting Frank L. Weil Memorial

Eagle Scout Scholarship

UNIT RECOGNITION:

Frank L. Weil Memorial National Jewish Committee on Scouting Unit Recognition Award

COUNCIL COMMITTEE RECOGNITION:

Frank L. Weil Council Jewish Committee on Scouting Award

NORTHEAST REGION RECOGNITION:

Bronze, Gold, and Silver Chai Awards

ADULT AWARDS:

Shofar 15-102

ABOUT THE EMBLEMS:

Maccabee: The National Jewish Committee on Scouting developed the Maccabee Emblem to help Tiger, Wolf, and Bear Cubs, who are Jewish, learn more about Judaism. It will also help them earn the Aleph Emblem as a Cub Scout or Webelos Scout, and the Ner Tamid Emblem as a Boy Scout, Varsity Scout, or Explorer. The Maccabee emblem takes its name from Judah Maccabee and his brothers, who led the military and religious struggle against the Syrian Hellenist King Antiochus, who attempted to suppress the practice of Judaism. Their revolt ended in victory with the rededication of the Temple in Jerusalem in the year 167 BCE. The holiday of Hanukkah celebrates this victory. The requirements for the Maccabee Emblem include:

1. Names: Learning the Jewish names of relatives and a Synagogue in the Scout's area.

2. Holidays: Learning the facts about and the Hebrew names of four Jewish holidays and carrying out an activity connected with each of the four holidays.

3. Terms: Learning the meaning of Mazal tov, Shalom, Yom tov, Torah, and Mitzvah.

4. Symbols: Identifying and learning how symbols, objects and articles are used.

5. Community Helpers: Learning about two community helpers including a Rabbi, Cantor, Jewish educator, or Jewish Community Center Worker (a sofer [scribe] or Jewish Federation worker can be substituted for one of the previous) and interviewing one.

6. Heroes: Learning about five Jewish heroes selected from a list of ten.

Aleph: Cub Scouts in grades 2 through 5 may earn the Aleph Emblem. The requirements for the Aleph Emblem include:

1. The Torah: Learning about the Torah, including the five books of the Torah, the Ten Commandments, and copying a verse or interpreting the Torah.

2. Prayer: Learning about prayer, including recitation of the Shema in Hebrew, understanding its meaning and learning Hebrew blessings over bread, wine and fruit.

3. Religious Holidays: Learning the Hebrew names of six Jewish holidays, how they are observed, things the Scout likes about each, and objects associated with those holidays.

4. Bible Hero: Learning about Bible Heroes and telling the story of two and why the Scout chose the two.

5. Famous American Jews: Learning about famous American Jews and writing a report on two.

6. The Synagogue: Learning about the Synagogue, attending religious services, reporting on a Torah reading monthly, and drawing pictures of the Ark and the Ner Tamid in the Scout's Synagogue and then telling what they mean to the Jewish people.

7. The Jewish Home: Learning about the Jewish Home - which object on the outside of a house or apartment tells us that Jews are living inside? Draw this object or make it out of wood, plastic, cardboard, or metal.

8. The Land of Israel: Learning about the Land of Israel, including reading about Israel, telling about two cities or places in Israel, replicating the flag of Israel and telling what it means to Jews the world over.

Ner Tamid: Boy Scouts may earn the Ner Tamid Emblem. The requirements for the Ner Tamid Emblem include:

1. Home Observance - Learning about living the Jewish life at home. This area is divided into four parts. The first is mandatory and the Scout may pick one of the remaining three.

a. Understanding how the Sabbath should be observed, its meaning and how High Holy Days and festivals are celebrated and the meaning of these observances: Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, Sukkoth, Pesach, Shabuoth, Hanukkah, Purim Tishah b'Ab.

b. Understand a Hebrew calendar (luach) learning how it differs from the general calendar, the names of Hebrew months, and the Hebrew dates of the High Holy Days and festivals.

c. Know the titles of at least five Jewish books each Jewish home should have and read and report on a book of Jewish interest.

d. Read and explain the verses in the Bible which contain some of the sources for the observance of kashruth, explain the reasons given in the Torah for the observance of kashruth, and tell how to observe kashruth while camping.

2. Synagogue Worship - Learning about living the Jewish life in the Synagogue. This area is divided into four parts. The first is mandatory and the Scout may pick one of the remaining three.

a. Attending synagogue services regularly, describing and explaining the use of sacred ceremonial objects, and telling what Jewish activities other than worship are sponsored by or conducted in the synagogue.

b. Explaining the important ideas contained in important prayers and writing a brief composition (about 200 words) on the subject: "How the Ner Tamid program helps a Scout put into practice a Scout is reverent."

c. Showing evidence of being Bar Mitzvah or that the Scout will be Bar Mitzvah, chanting or reading the blessings on being called to the Torah for an aliyah, explaining the meanings and contents of the tephillin, learning how and when they are used, and writing a brief composition (about 200 words) on the subject: "How the Ner Tamid program helps a Scout put into practice a Scout is reverent."

d. Showing evidence of being Bar Mitzvah or that the Scout is preparing for Bar Mitzvah or Confirmation, reading the blessings on being called to the Torah and the blessings of the Haftorah, and writing a brief composition (about 200 words) on the subject: "How the Ner Tamid program helps a Scout put into practice a Scout is reverent."

3. Jewish Study - Learning About Holy Scriptures and Sacred Literature. This area is divided into three parts. The first is mandatory and the Scout may pick one of the remaining two.

a. The Scout must give evidence of being a pupil at a Jewish religious school for at least three years (those who find it impossible to attend formal classes may substitute an equivalent course of private study under the supervision of the rabbi or counselor.)

b. Learning about the books of the Holy Scriptures that make up the Torah, the Prophets & the writings, telling the meaning of Sedra and Haftorah and learning about the Talmud.

c. Learning about fifteen great Jewish personalities and telling what made each of them famous.

4. The American Jewish Community - Learning about Living in the Land of Freedom. This area is divided into three parts. The first is mandatory and the Scout may pick one of the remaining two.

a. Service project - The Scout must elect from the list of service projects (pp. 19-21 of the Ner Tamid Record Book) at least three projects of service to the synagogue, Scout unit, and community to be fulfilled for a period of 1 year. (A Scout may receive credit for service projects fulfilled from the time he became a Tenderfoot Scout or an Explorer.)

b. Learning about five national Jewish organizations in the Scouts home area, learning about the Jewish population in the 10 largest cities in the United States and the Scout's home, and

c. Select seven great American Jews and describe their contribution to the building of America and the American Jewish Community (a list of choices is provided).

5. World Jewry - "We Are All Brothers." This area is divided into three parts. The first is mandatory and the Scout may pick one of the remaining two.

a. Learning about Israel, the rebirth of the State of Israel, and what agencies helped the rebuilding of Israel.

b. Learning about the national synagogue organizations and the major seminaries and rabbinical groups of the Orthodox, Conservative, and Reform branches of Judaism, national Jewish organizations serving Jewish youth in America and the work of the organizations.

c. Making a scrapbook of Jewish current events and listing the Jewish and general population in 10 important countries.

Etz Chaim: Boy Scouts and Venturers may earn the Etz Chaim Emblem. The requirements for the Etz Chaim Emblem were field tested in Salt Lake City, Baltimore, and Saint Louis in 1994-1995. The National Jewish Committee on Scouting advises that these requirements have not been finalized although the award has approved by the NJCS. They are presented here for informational purposes only, as there will be some minor changes in them before the official announcement. No one should use the requirements listed here as the basis for earning the emblem unless and until they have been formally announced by the NJCS. The award should be available nationally later in 1996. The following is taken from the NJCS Web Page:

"The Etz Chaim (Tree of Life) is a religious emblem which may be earned by registered Boy Scouts and Explorers (including young women registered as Explorers). By earning this emblem, young adults will discover possible adult Jewish roles in the context of family, community, and the Jewish people. The requirements can be completed within six months and require a counselor who is authorized by the Council Jewish Committee on Scouting. That counselor will be a community leader who is familiar with the Jewish community within which the Scout or Explorer resides, have a working knowledge of Jewish tradition and culture and be available as needed to provide guidance to the candidate. A rabbi, Jewish school teacher, JCC executive or Jewish youth group advisor who may or may not be active in Scouting may be suitable to serve as counselor. The National Jewish Committee on Scouting will assist candidates in locating and selecting a counselor if necessary.

Community and Family History

1. Describe when the first Jews arrived in your community and from where they came. Trace the history of the Jewish community in your general community.

2. Learn and describe when the following were established in your community and by whom:

  • The first Jewish cemetery; describe why a cemetery is important in Jewish tradition and law.

  • The first synagogue.

  • The first Jewish social club or benevolent society.

  • The first Jewish relief or charity organization.

3. Describe when your first family member came to your community, from where he/she/they came and why he/she/they came to your community.

Community Institutions and Agencies

1. Collect the bulletins, newsletters, and membership brochures of five Jewish organizations in community. Included in this should be at least one synagogue or independent havurah and the Jewish Community Center if one of each exists in your community. If there are fewer than five such organizations in your community, contact the state or regional officers of Jewish organizations which include your community.

2. Examine the names of organizations, the bulletin or newsletter mastheads, the logs, etc., and identify and explain the meanings of any Hebrew names or phrases. For each name or phrase, list where it is found in Jewish sources or tradition. For each name or phrase, describe why you think the organization chose it and what the name or phrase says about the organization today.

Community Jewish Leaders

1. Interview five adult Jews who are prominent in your community. Included in that group should be at least one rabbi and one Jewish agency or organization leader. During the interviews, determine the following:

  • Why did the leader enter the career or occupation in which he/she works?

  • What were the Jewish influences in the leader's life while growing up?

  • What volunteer work does this leader do and why?

  • Does the leader believe that Judaism and Jewish values influence his/her life today, and if so, how?

2. Write a short composition (about 500 words) on "The Qualities of Adult Jewish Leadership Today."

Your Community and the Jewish World

1. Obtain a copy of the Jewish newspaper that serves your community or region. Locate, read, and summarize two articles dealing with the concerns of Jews in the United States.

Locate, read, and summarize two articles dealing with the concerns of Jews from areas other than the United States, e.g., Israel, Europe, Canada.

2. Ask three Jewish adults you know what they do to help Jews outside the United States and why. Tell which one is most interesting to you.

Your Community and the Future

1. Ask 10 Jewish young adults and 10 Jewish adults what they think are the three most important challenges which face Jews in your community. Organize the responses in three lists: personal issues, family issues, and community issues. Select one issue from each list and describe what you think should be done to deal with it.

2. Locate and read an article from a national Jewish magazine about Jews and the future. Describe how the topic discussed in the article may affect your Jewish community.

Community Sharing

1. Create a record of your work for the Etz Chaim emblem. This may be a photographic essay, a videotape, a series of drawings, or a journal.

2. Give a presentation of what you have learned about your Jewish community to at least two groups. At least one of these should be a group of younger Jewish children. Use your record in your presentation."

NATIONAL JEWISH COMMITTEE ON SCOUTING:
FRANK L. WEIL MEMORIAL EAGLE SCOUT SCHOLARSHIP

Each year the National Jewish Committee on Scouting sponsors three Frank L. Weil Memorial Scholarships to Eagle Scouts. The first place scholarship is for $1,000.00 and each of the two second place scholarships is for $250.00.

Eligibility

1. Active member of a Boy Scout Troop, Varsity Scout Team or Explorer Post.

2. Have received the Eagle Scout Award.

3. Have been an active member of a synagogue and have received the Ner Tamid religious emblem.

4. Have demonstrated practical citizenship in synagogue, school, Scouting, and community.

5. Be enrolled in a high school and in his final year at the time of selection.

6. Submit at least four letters of recommendation and testimony with the nomination; one each from leaders of religious institutions, school, community and the Scouting unit.

CRITERIA FOR UNIT RECOGNITION

Frank L. Weil Memorial National Jewish Committee on Scouting Unit Recognition Award: The award is named in memory of Frank L. Weil, one of the founders of the NJCS and its chairman from 1935-1957. Of prime importance to the NJCS is its concern for quality Scouting under Jewish auspices.

The purpose of this program is to recognize the chartered organization to help motivate and improve the effectiveness of the individual unit and its adult leadership, and to provide each youth with a top-quality program.

The award, available through the NJCS, consists of:

1. A certificate for the charted organization

2. A colored ribbon for the unit

3. A multicolored, embroidered patch for each registered member (youth and adult)

Implementing the Program

The NJCS administers the program through the representative to each of the regions. Each unit may earn this recognition on its own merit for a particular calendar year, and may earn it for succeeding years, providing the yearly requirements are met. Units should aim to achieve all seven objects; six must be met to qualify for the award (the five starred items plus one other item).

Eligible units should submit certification at rechartering time directly to the National Jewish Committee on Scouting, 1325 Walnut Hill Lane, PO Box 152079, Irving TX 75015-2079. An appropriate ceremony will be arranged for presentation of this recognition.

Requirements

BSA Quality Unit Award

1. Our unit earned the BSA Quality Unit Award. *

Finance

2. Our unit participated in and supported the council's Friends of Scouting effort.

Community Service

3. Our unit conducted a service project for the chartered organization. Please describe: *

Membership

4. Our unit rechartered on time according to our council's charter renewal plan. *

5. Our unit had an increase in youth membership over the previous year. *

Religious Emblems

6. A minimum of 20 percent of our registered members had earned their religious emblem as of the charter renewal date.

Religious Activities

7. (must do two out of three) *

  • Our unit participated in a Jewish religious retreat.

  • Our unit participated in Scout Sabbath observances.

  • Our unit conducted services on Sabbath or other observances when camping.

CRITERIA FOR COUNCIL COMMITTEE RECOGNITION

The Frank L. Weil Council Jewish Committee on Scouting Award (Lapel may be earned by local committees which meet the following requirements:

1. At least 50% of units chartered to Jewish organizations in the council earn Frank L. Weil Unit recognition;

2. Total youth membership showed a growth as of December 31 compared to a year ago;

3. All committee members are enrolled as Friends of Scouting (formerly SME);

4. 20% of Jewish Scouts in units with Jewish organization sponsors have earned their age appropriate religious emblems;

5. Complete one of the following:

  • Conduct a Jewish Scouting retreat (Kinus),

  • Conduct a Scout Shabbat service;

6. Complete one of the following:

  • All Jewish sponsored units in the council carried out a service project for their chartered organization,

  • Execute a community wide service project for a relevant Jewish cause.

A Council Jewish Committee on Scouting may obtain an application by writing to NJCS, Relationships Division, BSA, PO Box 152079, 1325 W. Walnut Lane, Irving TX 75015-2079 and request Frank L. Weil Local Council Jewish Committee on Scouting application.

NORTHEAST REGIONAL RECOGNITION - CHAI AWARDS

The CHAI awards have been established to recognize individuals who have provided outstanding service on the local or regional level of Scouting. It is hoped that these awards will serve to encourage additional work on behalf of Scouting and the Jewish Community. Nominations are open to everyone.

The Award Nomination form should be signed by the local council Scout Executive, the local council JCOS chairman and another member of the committee. Please mail the application at least thirty (30) days prior to the Northeast Region Jewish Committee on Scouting Conference. Complete the application based on the Award Requirements. There are three levels in the Chai Awards - Bronze, Gold, and Silver, based on tenure, prior awards, and level of service.

 

SCOUTING ASSOCIATIONS:



National Jewish Committee on Scouting (NJCS)
Boy Scouts of America
1325 Walnut Hill Lane
P. O. Box 152079
Irving, Texas 75062-1296

J-SCOUT: The National Jewish Scouting Committee developed the J-Scout e-mail discussion list to announce various programs it is producing, such as the new religious emblem for older Boy Scouts and Explorers, regional kinusim, kosher Wood Badge and other training courses, scholarships, and other awards. Other Jewish Scouting organizations are invited to use the list in the same manner. It is not necessary to be Jewish to subscribe. Subscription Informtion

RESOURCES:

BSA, Audiovisual Service, My Son, the Scout (Video Tape), No. AV-006.

BSA, Relationships Division, A Complete Youth Program: Scouting in Synagogues, No. 15-128 (1988)

BSA, Relationships Division, A Complete Jewish Education: Scouting in the Jewish Day School, No. 15-219 (1989)

BSA, Relationships Division, Activity Guide for Tiger Cubs of Jewish Faith, No. 15-230.

BSA, Relationships Division, Aleph Program for Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts, No. 3184A (1991).

BSA, Relationships Division, An Activity Guide for Tiger Cubs of Jewish Faith, No. 15-230.

BSA, Relationships Division, Conducting Scout Sabbath Services, No. 15-208.

BSA, Relationships Division, Eagle Scout Scholarship Application, No. 15-253.

BSA, Relationships Division, Exploring and Your Youth Group, No. 23-534 (Jewish).

BSA, Relationships Division, Fact Sheet: Scouting Serves the Jewish Community, No.2-547 1989.

BSA, Relationships Division, Find Adventure, Join the Boy Scouts of America.

BSA, Relationships Division, Flag of the Jewish Committee - BSA, No. 15-188.

BSA, Relationships Division, Guide for Rabbis and Jewish Chaplains at Camp, No. 15-121.

BSA, Relationships Division, Hanukkah Program Suggestions for Scouts and Explorers.

BSA, Relationships Division, Hatsofe (Newsletter).

BSA, Relationships Division, Holiday Program Suggestions for Cub Scout Leaders, No. 15-133.

BSA, Relationships Division, Holiday Program Suggestions for Tiger Cub Partners and Cub Scout Leaders, No. 15-240 (Jewish).

BSA, Relationships Division, Jewish Holidays - Dates and Explanations, No. 15-117.

BSA, Relationships Division, Jewish Relationships Service order form, No. 15-107.

BSA, Relationships Division, Jewish Religious Service for Scouts and Explorers.

BSA, Relationships Division, Jewish Tiger Cub Big Ideas.

BSA, Relationships Division, Keeping the Sabbath While Camping.

BSA, Relationships Division, Kosher Food at Scout Camp.

BSA, Relationships Division, Kosher Food in Scouting, No. 15-247.

BSA, Relationships Division, Maccabee Emblem for Tiger Cubs, No. 7163 (1988).

BSA, Relationships Division, Monthly Program Themes for Cub Scouts and Webelos

Scouts of Jewish Faith, No. 15-231A.

BSA, Relationships Division, Monthly Program Themes for Cub Scouts and Webelos

Scouts of Jewish Faith, No. 15-231B.

BSA, Relationships Division, Monthly Program Themes for Cub Scouts and Webelos

Scouts of Jewish Faith, No. 15-231C.

BSA, Relationships Division, Monthly Program Themes for Cub Scouts and Webelos

Scouts of Jewish Faith, No. 15-231D.

BSA, Relationships Division, Monthly Program Themes for Boy Scouts of Jewish Faith, No. 15-232.

BSA, Relationships Division, Ner Tamid Award Record Book.

BSA, Relationships Division, Ner Tamid News Bulletin.

BSA, Relationships Division, Opportunities Unlimited: Council Jewish Committee on Scouting, No. -15-248 (1989).

BSA, Relationships Division, Shofar Award Guidelines for Adults.

BSA, Relationships Division, Scout Sabbath services, No. 15-208.

BSA, Relationships Division, Scouting in Synagogues and Centers, No. 15-128 (1982).

BSA, Relationships Division, Scouting Interest cards, No. 15-103.

BSA, Relationships Division, Scouting Serves the Jewish Community baseball caps, No. 15-228.

BSA, Relationships Division, Scouting Serves the Jewish Community clip art, No. 2-214.

BSA, Relationships Division, Scouting Serves the Jewish Community mug, No. 15-223.

BSA, Relationships Division, Scouting Serves the Jewish Community patch, No. 15-224.

BSA, Relationships Division, The New Scouting Emphasis: A Resource for Jewish Community Center Programs, No. 15-215 (1992).

BSA, Relationships Division, Tiger Cubs, BSA: A Scouting Program for First-Grade Boys of Jewish Faith, No. 15-240.

BSA, Supply Division, Aleph Emblem Requirements and Record Booklet, No. 33184.

BSA, Supply Division, Counselor's Guide to the Maccabee Award, No. 3933.

BSA, Supply Division, Maccabee Emblem Record Booklet, No. 7165.

BSA, Supply Division, Ner Tamid Emblem Requirements and Record Booklet, No. 33184.

BSA, Relationships Division, Woods Wisdom, Jewish Program Themes, No. 15-232.

National Jewish Committee on Scouting, Aleph Certificate

National Jewish Committee on Scouting, Eagle Scout Scholarship Program.

National Jewish Committee on Scouting, Guide for the Jewish Chaplain at Boy Scout Camp, No. 15-121.

National Jewish Committee on Scouting, Holiday Programs for Tiger Cub Partners and Cub Scout Leaders, No. 15-243 (1989).

National Jewish Committee on Scouting, Information on the Aleph Emblem

National Jewish Committee on Scouting, Information on the Maccabee Emblem

National Jewish Committee on Scouting, Maccabee Certificate

National Jewish Committee on Scouting, Ner Tamid Certificate

National Jewish Committee on Scouting, Scout Sabbath Services (1985).

WHERE TO WRITE FOR MORE INFORMATION:

Director, Jewish Relationships Service, S205

Boy Scouts of America

1325 Walnut Hill Lane

P.O. Box 152079

Irving, Texas 75015-2079

1-214-580-2059

Or

P.R.A.Y.

P.O. Box 6900

St. Louis, Missouri 63123

1-800 933-PRAY


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