Architecture and Landscape Architecture Merit Badge Pamphlet Architecture Merit Badge

Architecture


Requirements were REVISED effective January 1, 2010.

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    1. Tour your community and list the different building types you see. Try to identify buildings that can be associated with a specific period of history or style of architecture. Make a sketch of the building you most admire.
    2. Select an architectural achievement that has had a major impact on society. Using resources such as the Internet (with your parent's permission), books, and magazines, find out how this achievement has influenced the world toady. Tell your counselor what you learned.
  1. Arrange to meet with an architect. Ask to see the architect's office and to talk about the following:
    1. Careers in architecture
    2. Educational requirements
    3. Tools an architect uses
    4. Processes involved in a building project.
    In the Outdoor Code, a Scout pledges to "be conservation-minded." Discuss the following with your counselor:
    1. The term sustainable architecture. Identify three features typical of green buildings.
    2. The difference between renewable building materials and recycled building materials, and how each can be used in construction.
    3. The relationship of architecture with its surrounding environment and the community.
    4. How entire buildings can be reused rather than torn down when they no longer serve their original purpose.
  2. Arrange to visit a construction project with the project's architect. Ask to see the construction drawings so that you can compare how the project is drawn on paper to how it is actually built. Notice the different building materials. Find out how they are used, why they were selected, and what determines how they are being put together.
    Note: This requirement necessitates advance planning and permission from your parents, your counselor, and the manager of the construction site. While on site, you must closely follow the safety procedures of the construction site, including wearing a hard hat.

    Do ONE of the following:
    1. With your parent's and counselor's permission and approval, arrange to meet with an architect. Ask to see the scale model of a building and the drawings that a builder would use to construct this building. Discuss why the different building materials were selected. Look at the details in the drawings and the scale model to see how the materials and components are attached to each other during construction.
    2. With your parent's and counselor's permission and approval, arrange to meet with an architect at a construction site. Ask the architect to bring drawings that the builder uses to construct the building. While at the site, discuss why the different building materials being used were selected. Discuss how the different building materials and components are attached to each other during construction.
      Note: To visit a construction site will require advance planning. You will need permission from your parents, counselor, the architect, and the construction site manager. A construction site is a very dangerous place. While there, you will need to closely follow the site manager's directions and comply with all the safety procedures, including wearing a hard hat protective eyewear, and proper footwear.
    3. Interview someone who might be your client (such as a prospective homeowner or business owner) if you were an architect. Find out what your client's requirements would be for designing a new home or business building. Write a short program including a list of requirements for the project, the functions of the building and site, hoe the functions relate to one another, and the goals of the project.
  3. Interview the owner or occupant of a home or other building (your "Client"). Find out what your client's requirements would be for designing a new home or business facility. Write down all of your client's requirements that you think would affect layout or design of the new facility.
    Measure a room such as one where you live or where your troop meets. Make an accurately scaled drawing of the room's floor plan showing walls, doors, closets, windows, and any built-in furniture or cabinets. Neatly label your drawing with the following: your name, the date, what room you drew, and the scale of the drawing. (Drawing scale: 1/4 inch = 1 foot)
  4. Measure your bedroom. Make an accurately scaled drawing of the floor plan indicating walls, doors, windows, and furniture. Neatly label your drawing, including your name and the date. (Drawing scale: 1/4 inch = 1 foot)
    Find out about three career opportunities in architecture. Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.

BSA Advancement ID#: 20
Requirements last updated in: 2010
Pamphlet Publication Number: 35857
Pamphlet Stock (SKU) Number: 35857
Pamphlet Revision Date: 2008

Worksheets for use in working on these requirements: Format
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Page updated on: May 04, 2013



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