Baloo's Bugle

February Cub Scout Roundtable Issue

Volume 14, Issue 7
March 2008 Theme

Theme: Litter to Glitter
Webelos: Engineer & Athlete
Tiger Cub Activities

ONE LAST THING

Can I borrow $25?
Baloo's E-mail Inbox

A man came home from work late, tired and irritated, to find his 5-year old son waiting for him at the door.

SON:    'Daddy, may I ask you a question?'

DAD:   'Yeah sure, what it is?' replied the man.

SON:   'Daddy, how much do you make an hour?'

DAD:   'That's none of your business. Why do you ask such a thing?' the man said angrily.

SON:   'I just want to know. Please tell me, how much do you make an hour?'

DAD:    'If you must know, I make $50 an hour.'

SON:   'Oh,' the little boy replied, with his head down.

SON:    'Daddy, may I please borrow $25?'

The father was furious, 'If the only reason you asked that is so you can borrow some money to buy a silly toy or some other nonsense, then you march yourself straight to your room and go to bed. Think about why you are being so selfish. I don't work hard everyday for such childish  frivolities.' The little boy quietly went to his room and shut the door.

The man sat down and started to get even angrier about the little boy's questions.  How dare he ask such questions only to get some money? After about an hour or so, the man had calmed down, and started to think: Maybe there was something he really needed to buy with that $25.00 and he really didn't ask for money very often. The man went to the door of the little boy's room and opened the door. 'Are you asleep, son?' He asked.

'No daddy, I'm awake,' replied the boy. 'I've been thinking, maybe I was too hard on you earlier' said the man. 'It's been a long day and I took out my aggravation on you. Here's the $25 you asked for.'

The little boy sat straight up, smiling. 'Oh, thank you daddy!' He yelled. Then, reaching under his pillow he pulled out some crumpled up bills. The man saw that the boy already had money, started to get angry again. The little boy slowly counted out his money, and then looked up at his father.

'Why do you want more money if you already have some?' the father grumbled.

Because I didn't have enough, but now I do,' the little boy replied. 'Daddy, I have $50 now. Can I buy an hour of your time? Please come home early tomorrow. I would like to have dinner with you.'

The father was crushed. He put his arms around his little son, and he begged for his forgiveness. It's just a short reminder to all of you working so hard in life. We should not let time slip through our fingers without having spent some time with those who really matter to us, those close to our hearts. Do remember to share that $50 worth of your time with someone you love.

If we die tomorrow, the company that we are working for could easily replace us in a matter of hours. But the family & friends we leave behind will feel the loss for the rest of their lives.

Thanks for Your Time

Baloo's E-mail Inbox

To all Cub Scout volunteers everywhere and my family & friends I want to thank you for your time.
Once you read this you will understand.  CD

A young man learns what's most important in life from the guy next door.

It had been some time since Jack had seen the old man. College, girls, career, and life itself got in the way. In fact, Jack moved clear across the country in pursuit of his dreams. There, in the rush of his busy life, Jack had little time to think about the past and often no time to spend with his wife and son. He was working on his future, and nothing could stop him.  

Over the phone, his mother told him, "Mr. Belser died last night. The funeral is Wednesday." Memories flashed through his mind like an old newsreel as he sat quietly remembering his childhood days.  

"Jack, did you hear me?"  

"Oh, sorry, Mom. Yes, I heard you. It's been so long since I thought of him. I'm sorry, but I honestly thought he died years ago," Jack said.  

"Well, he didn't forget you. Every time I saw him he'd ask how you were doing. He'd reminisce about the many days you spent over 'his side of the fence' as he put it," Mom told him.  

"I loved that old house he lived in," Jack said.  

"You know, Jack, after your father died, Mr. Belser stepped in to make sure you had a man's influence in your life," she said  

"He's the one who taught me carpentry," he said. "I wouldn't be in this business if it weren't for him. He spent a lot of time teaching me things he thought were important... Mom, I'll be there for the funeral," Jack said.  

As busy as he was, he kept his word. Jack caught the next flight to his hometown. Mr. Belser's funeral was small and uneventful. He had no children of his own, and most of his relatives had passed away.  

The night before he had to return home, Jack and his Mom stopped by to see the old house next door one more time.  

Standing in the doorway, Jack paused for a moment. It was like crossing over into another dimension, a leap through space and time The house was exactly as he remembered. Every step held memories. Every picture, every piece of furniture... .Jack stopped suddenly.  

"What's wrong, Jack?" his Mom asked.  

"The box is gone," he said

"What box?" Mom asked.  

"There was a small gold box that he kept locked on top of his desk. I must have asked him a thousand times what was inside. All he'd ever tell me was   'the thing I value most ,'" Jack said.  

It was gone. Everything about the house was exactly how Jack remembered it, except for the box. He figured someone from the Belser family had taken it.  

"Now I'll never know what was so valuable to him," Jack said. "I better get some sleep. I have an early flight home, Mom."  

It had been about two weeks since Mr. Belser died Returning home from work one day Jack discovered a note in his mailbox. "Signature required on a package. No one at home. Please stop by the main post office within the next three days," the note read.  

Early the next day Jack retrieved the package. The small box was old and looked like it had been mailed a hundred years ago. The handwriting was difficult to read, but the return address caught his attention. "Mr. Harold Belser" it read. Jack took the box out to his car and ripped open the package. There inside was the gold box and an envelope. Jack's hands shook as he read the note inside.  

"Upon my death, please forward this box and its contents to Jack Bennett. It's the thing I valued most in my life." A small key was taped to the letter. His heart racing, as tears filling his eyes, Jack carefully unlocked the box. There inside he found a beautiful gold pocket watch.  

Running his fingers slowly over the finely etched casing, he unlatched the cover. Inside he found these words engraved:   

"Jack, Thanks for your time! -Harold Belser."

"The thing he valued most was...my time"  

Jack held the watch for a few minutes, then called his office and cleared his appointments for the next two days. "Why?" Janet, his assistant asked.  

"I need some time to spend with my son," he said.  

"Oh, by the way, Janet, thanks for your time!"  

"Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take but by the moments that take our breath away,"  


Think about this. You may not realize it, but it's 100% true.  

  • At least 2 people in this world love you so much they would die for you.  
  • At least 15 people in this world love you in some way.  
  •  A smile from you can bring happiness to anyone, even if they don't like you.  
  • Every night, SOMEONE thinks about you before they go to sleep.  
  • You mean the world to someone.  
  • If not for you, someone may not be living.  
  • You are special and unique.  
  • When you think you have no chance of getting what you want, you probably won't get it, but if you trust God to do what's best, and wait on His time, sooner or later, you will get it or something better.  
  • When you make the biggest mistake ever, something good can still come from it.  
  • When you think the world has turned its back on you, take a look: you most likely turned your back on the world.  
  • Someone that you don't even know exists loves you.  
  • Always remember the compliments you received. Forget about the rude remarks.  
  • Always tell someone how you feel about them; you will feel much better when they know and you'll both be happy.  
  • If you have a great friend, take the time to let them know that they are great.  
 
 

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