Boy Scout
Advancement
Requirements Changes

Effective on or after April 1, 2010


NOTE:  The following information on the 2010 Historical Merit Badge program was effective ONLY during 2010, and is shown below only for the record.  The links will no longer work.

BSA has announced a special program in honor of the 100th anniversary of the founding of the BSA, which includes the reintroduction, for 2010 only, of four Historical Merit Badges - Carpentry, Pathfinding, Signaling, and Tracking.

The basics of the 2010 Historical Merit Badge program include:

  • An overall goal of the program is for a majority of the BSA’s registered Boy Scouts to earn one or more of the merit badges during the centennial year, 2010.
  • The badges offered have a history that can be traced back to the origins of the BSA.
  • The original requirements are being used, as well as supported by scanned pages of the early merit badge pamphlets so a Scout can view what a Scout 100 years ago used. Supporting the scanned pages of the original pamphlets are information guides for each merit badge that explain what a Scout of 1910 might have experienced, along with background information to assist a Scout in understanding what maybe unfamiliar terms.
  • The contemporary merit badges closely resemble the original designs of their counterparts with the exception of the border, which is gold. The unique border will immediately identify it as a 2010 historic merit badge.
  • The four historical merit badges may be used toward a Scout’s rank advancement.
  • The effective date for earning these new merit badges is April 1, 2010, and requirements must be completed no later than Dec. 31, 2010..
  • The BSA will not reprint the pamphlets for these merit badges. Reprints of the original merit badge pamphlets are posted to http://www.scouting.org/BoyScouts/AdvancementandAwards/MeritBadges.aspx
  • As with all merit badges, units, districts, and councils should recruit and register qualified counselors for these badges.

Badges may be earned by individual Scouts. District and council advancement committees are encouraged to offer opportunities for Scouts to work on at least some of these merit badges at resident camp, at camporees, or during special anniversary celebrations. See the “how to” sections for additional support at http://www.scouting.org/BoyScouts/AdvancementandAwards/MeritBadges.aspx

For further information about the 2010 Historical Merit Badges program,
see the BSA website by Clicking here.

In addition to the Historic Merit Badges, BSA has announced three new merit badges to be released during 2010 - Geocaching, Scouting Heritage, and Inventing.  As they are released, the requirements will be added to this report. A new merit badge for Robotics has also been announced, but it will not be issued until early 2011.

In April or May, 2010, a new pamphlet, with revised requirements, for MUSIC Merit Badge was released.  The changes, which include dropping Bugling as a separate merit badge, become effective on January 1, 2011, but Scouts with the new pamphlet may begin using the new requirements, if they wish, during 2010.


HISTORICAL MERIT BADGES
These four Historical Merit Badges can be earned only during calendar year 2010,
in honor of the 100th anniversary of the Boy Scouts of America.

Carpentry
Pathfinder
Signaler
Tracking


NEW Merit Badges

Geocaching
Inventing
Scouting Heritage

REVISED Merit Badges

Astronomy
Music


Historic Carpentry Merit BadgeCarpentry

This Historical Merit Badge can be earned only during calendar year 2010, in honor of the 100th anniversary of the Boy Scouts of America.
It was first offered in 1911 and discontinued in 1952.

These are the original requirements written in 1911.

The requirements are as follows:

To obtain a Merit Badge for Carpentry, a Scout must:

  1. Demonstrate the use of the rule, square, level, plumb-line, miter, chalk-line and bevel.
  2. Demonstrate the proper way to drive, set, and clinch a nail, draw a spike with a claw-hammer, and to join two pieces of wood with screws.
  3. Show correct use of the cross-cut saw and of the rip-saw.
  4. Show how to plane the edge, end and the broad surface of a board.
  5. Demonstrate how to lay shingles.
  6. Make a simple article of furniture for practical use in the home or on the home grounds, finished in a workmanlike manner, all work to be done without assistance.

Historic Pathfinding Merit BadgePathfinding

This Historical Merit Badge can be earned only during calendar year 2010, in honor of the 100th anniversary of the Boy Scouts of America.
It was first offered in 1911 and discontinued in 1952.

These are the original requirements written in 1911.

The requirements are as follows:

To obtain a Merit Badge for Pathfinding, a Scout must:

  1. In the country, know every lane, bypath, and short cut for a distance of at least two miles in every direction around the local scout headquarters; or in a city, have a general knowledge of the district within a three-mile radius of the local scout headquarters, so as to be able to guide people at any time, by day or by night.
  2. Know the population of the five principal neighboring towns, their general direction from his scout headquarters, and be able to give strangers correct directions how to reach them.
  3. If in the country, know in a two mile radius, the approximate number of horses, cattle, sheep, and pigs owned on the five neighboring farms; or, in a town, know, in a half-mile radius, the location of livery stables, garages and blacksmith shops.
  4. Know the location of the nearest meat markets, bakeries, groceries, and drug stores.
  5. Know the location of the the nearest police station, hospital, doctor, fire alarm, fire hydrant, telegraph and telephone offices, and railroad stations.
  6. Know something of the history of his place; and know the location of its principal public buildings, such as the town or city hall, post-office, schools and churches.
  7. Submit a map not necessarily drawn by himself upon which he personally has indicated as much as possible of the above information.

NOTE: These requirements differ from the original draft requirements previously posted on this web site.


Historic Signaling Merit BadgeSignaling

This Historical Merit Badge can be earned only during calendar year 2010, in honor of the 100th anniversary of the Boy Scouts of America.
It was first offered in 1910 (as Signaler) and discontinued in 1992 (as Signaling).

These are the original requirements for Signaling written in 1911.

The requirements are as follows:

To obtain a Merit Badge for Signaling, a Scout must:

  1. Make an electric buzzer outfit, wireless, blinker, or other signaling device.
  2. Send and receive in the International Morse Code, by buzzer or other sound device, a complete message of not less than 35 words, at a rate of not less than 35 letters per minute.
  3. Demonstrate an ability to send and receive a message in the International Morse Code by wigwag and by blinker or other light signaling device at a rate of not less than 20 letters per minute.
  4. Send and receive by Semaphore Code at the rate of not less than 30 letters per minute.
  5. Know the proper application of the International Morse Code and Semaphore Codes; when, where, and how they can be used to best advantage.
  6. Discuss briefly various other codes and methods of signaling which are in common use.

Historic Tracking Merit BadgeTracking

This Historical Merit Badge can be earned only during calendar year 2010, in honor of the 100th anniversary of the Boy Scouts of America.
It was first offered (as Stalking) in 1911 and discontinued in 1952.

This merit badge was originally entitled Stalking. Because of what the term stalking means in today’s language, the original name has been changed to Tracking.

These are the original requirements as written in 1911, except as noted above.

NOTE:  As originally posted on the BSA site, one of the original requirements was deleted in error.  That requirement (No 4 below) has been restored.  In requirement 4, the phrase "has tracked a human being" should be interpreted in terms of "while searching for a missing person".

The requirements are as follows:

To obtain a Merit Badge for [Tracking], a Scout must:

  1. Demonstrate by means of a [tracking] game or otherwise, ability to [track] skillfully in shelter and wind, etc., showing how to proceed noiselessly and “freeze” when occasion demands.
  2. Know and recognize the tracks of ten different kinds of animals or birds in his vicinity, three of which may be domestic.
  3. Submit satisfactory evidence that he has trailed two different kinds of wild animals or birds on ordinary ground far enough to determine the direction in which they were going, and their gait or speed. Give the names of animals or birds trailed, their direction of travel, and describe gait and speed; or submit satisfactory evidence that he has trailed six different kinds of wild animal or birds in snow, sand, dust, or mud, far enough to determine the direction they were going and their gait or speed. Give names of animals or birds, their direction of travel, and describe gait and speed.
  4. Submit satisfactory evidence that he has tracked a human being and deducted from the trail whether it was man or woman, young or old, the gait or speed, and also give any other information deduced.
  5. Submit evidence the he has scored at least 30 points from the following groups:
    [Group (f) and 4 of the 5 groups (a), (b), (c), (d), (e) must be represented in the score of 30 and at least 7 points must be scored from (a), (b), or (c)].

    Make clear recognizable photographs of:

    a. Live bird away from nest 4 points each
    b. Live woodchuck or smaller wild animal 3 points each
    c. Live wild animal larger than woodchuck 4 points each
    d. Live bird on nest 3 points each
    e. Tracks of live wild animal or bird 2 points each
    f. Make satisfactory plaster cast of wild animal or bird tracks with identification imprint on back of each 2 points each

NOTE: These requirements differ from the original draft requirements previously posted on this web site.

The requirements are as follows:


Geocaching Merit BadgeGeocaching

The requirements for this badge were released by BSA on April 12, 2010.

The official announcement of this Merit Badge was made by BSA on the Scouting Magazine Blog at
http://blog.scoutingmagazine.org/2010/04/official-geocaching-merit-badge-requirements-released.html

The merit badge pamphlet is not yet available.  The requirements are as follows:

  1. Do the following:
    1. Explain to your counselor the most likely hazards you may encounter while participating in geocaching activities and what you should do to anticipate, help prevent, mitigate, and respond to these hazards.
    2. Discuss first aid and prevention for the types of injuries or illnesses that could occur while participating in geocaching activities, including cuts, scrapes, snakebite, insect stings, tick bites, exposure to poisonous plants, heat and cold reactions (sunburn, heatstroke, heat exhaustion, hypothermia), and dehydration.
    3. Discuss how to properly plan an activity that uses GPS, including using the buddy system, sharing your plan with others, and considering the weather, route, and proper attire.
  2. Discuss the following with your counselor:
    1. Why you should never bury a cache.
    2. How to use proper geocaching etiquette when hiding or seeking a cache, and how to properly hide, post, maintain, and dismantle a geocache
    3. The principles of Leave No Trace as they apply to geocaching
  3. Explain the following terms used in geocaching: waypoint, log, cache, accuracy, difficulty and terrain ratings, attributes, trackable. Choose five additional terms to explain to your counselor.
  4. Explain how the Global Positioning System (GPS) works. Then, using Scouting’s teaching EDGE, demonstrate the use of a GPS unit to your counselor. Include marking and editing a waypoint, changing field functions, and changing the coordinate system in the unit.
  5. Do the following:
    1. Show you know how to use a map and compass and explain why this is important for geocaching.
    2. Explain the similarities and differences between GPS navigation and standard map reading skills and describe the benefits of each.
    3. Explain the UTM (Universal Transverse Mercator) system and how it differs from the latitude/longitude system used for public geocaches.
    4. Show how to plot a UTM waypoint on a map. Compare the accuracy to that found with a GPS unit.
  6. Describe the four steps to finding your first cache to your counselor. Then mark and edit a waypoint.
  7. With your parent’s permission*, go to www.geocaching.com. Type in your zip code to locate public geocaches in your area. Share the posted information about three of those geocaches with your counselor. Then, pick one of the three and find the cache.
    *To fulfill this requirement, you will need to set up a free user account with www.geocaching.com. Ask your parent for permission and help before you do so.
  8. Do ONE of the following:
    1. If a Cache to Eagle« series exists in your council, visit at least three of the 12 locations in the series. Describe the projects that each cache you visit highlights, and explain how the Cache to Eagle« program helps share our Scouting service with the public.
    2. Create a Scouting-related Travel Bug« that promotes one of the values of Scouting. "Release" your Travel Bug into a public geocache and, with your parent’s permission, monitor its progress at www.geocaching.com for 30 days. Keep a log, and share this with your counselor at the end of the 30-day period.
    3. Set up and hide a public geocache, following the guidelines in the Geocaching merit badge pamphlet. Before doing so, share with your counselor a six-month maintenance plan for the geocache where you are personally responsible for the first three months. After setting up the geocache, with your parent’s permission, follow the logs online for 30 days and share them with your counselor.
    4. Explain what Cache In Trash Out (CITO) means, and describe how you have practiced CITO at public geocaches or at a CITO event. Then, either create CITO containers to leave at public caches, or host a CITO event for your unit or for the public.
  9. Plan a geohunt for a youth group such as your troop or a neighboring pack, at school, or your place of worship. Choose a theme, set up a course with at least four waypoints, teach the players how to use a GPS unit, and play the game. Tell your counselor about your experience, and share the materials you used and developed for this event.

Inventing Merit BadgeInventing

The requirements for this badge were released by BSA on June 17, 2010, at a public ceremony.

  1. In your own words, define inventing. Then do the following:
    1. Explain to your merit badge councilor the role of inventors and their inventions in the economic development of the United States.
    2. List three inventions and how they have helped humankind.
  2. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Identify and interview with a buddy (and with your parent’s permission and merit badge counselor’s approval) an individual in your community who has invented a useful item. Report what you learned to your counselor.
    2. Read about three inventors. Select the one you find most interesting and tell your counselor what you learned.
  3. Do EACH of the following:
    1. Define the term intellectual property. Explain which government agency oversees the protection of intellectual property, the types of intellectual property that can be protected, how such property is protected, and why protection is necessary.
    2. Explain the components of a patent and the different types of patents available.
    3. Examine your Scouting gear and find a patent number on a camp item you have used. With your parent’s permission, use the Internet to find out more about that patent. Compare the finished item with the claims and drawings in the patent. Report what you learned to your counselor.
    4. Explain the term patent infringement.
  4. Discuss with your counselor the types of inventions that are appropriate to share with others without protecting and explain why. Tell your counselor about one nonpatented or noncopyrighted invention and its impact on society.
  5. Choose a commercially available product that you have used on an overnight camping trip with your troop. Make recommendations for improving the product, make a sketch that shows your recommendations, and discuss your recommendations with your counselor.
  6. Think of an item you would like to invent that would solve a problem for your family, troop, chartered organization, community, or a special-interest group. Then do EACH of the following, while keeping a notebook to record your progress:
    1. Talk to potential users of your invention and determine their needs. Then, based on what you have learned, write a proposal about the invention and how it would help solve a problem. This proposal should include a detailed sketch of the invention.
    2. Create a model of the item using clay, cardboard, or any other readily available material. List the materials necessary to build a prototype of the item.
    3. Share the idea and model with your counselor and potential users of your invention. Record their feedback in your notebook.
  7. Build a working prototype of the item you invented for requirement 6*, then test and evaluate the invention. Among the aspects to consider in your evaluation are cost, usefulness, marketability, appearance, and function. Describe how your initial vision and expectations for your idea and the final product are similar or dissimilar. Have your counselor evaluate and critique your prototype.
  8. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Participate in an invention, science, engineering, or robotics club or team that builds a useful item. Share your experience with your counselor.
    2. Visit a museum or exhibit dedicated to an inventor or invention, and create a presentation of your visit to share with a group such as your troop or patrol.
  9. Discuss with your counselor the diverse skills, education, training, and experience it takes to be an inventor. Discuss how you can prepare yourself to be creative and inventive to solve problems at home, in school, and in your community. Discuss three career fields that might utilize the skills of an inventor.

*Before you begin building the prototype, you must share your design and building plans with your counselor and have your counselor’s approval


Scouting Heritage Merit BadgeScouting Heritage

The requirements for this badge were released by BSA around April 15, 2010, when they appeared on BSA's web site.

The merit badge pamphlet was not yet available, but should be in Scout Shops and local council service centers by the end of April, 2010. 

The requirements are as follows:

  1. Discuss with your counselor the life and times of Lord Baden-Powell of Gilwell. Explain why he felt a program like Scouting would be good for the young men of his day. Include in your discussion how Scouting was introduced in the United States, and the origins of Boy Scouting and Cub Scouting under Baden-Powell.
  2. Do the following:
    1. Give a short biographical sketch of any TWO of the following, and tell of their role in how Scouting developed and grew in the United States prior to 1940.
      1. Daniel Carter Beard
      2. William D. Boyce
      3. Waite Phillips
      4. Ernest Thompson Seton
      5. James E. West
    2. Discuss the significance to Scouting of any TWO of the following:
      1. Brownsea Island
      2. The First World Jamboree
      3. Boy Scout Handbook
      4. Boys’ Life magazine
  3. Discuss with your counselor how Scouting’s programs have developed over time and been adapted to fit different age groups and interests (Cub Scouting, Boy Scouting, Exploring, Venturing)
  4. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Attend either a BSA national jamboree, OR world Scout jamboree, OR a national BSA high-adventure base. While there, keep a journal documenting your day-to-day experiences. Upon your return, report to your counselor what you did, saw, and learned. You may include photos, brochures, and other documents in your report.
    2. Write or visit the National Scouting Museum in Irving, Texas.* Obtain information about this facility. Give a short report on what you think the role of this museum is in the Scouting program.
      • *If you visit the BSA’s national traveling tour, Adventure Base 100, in 2010, you may use this experience to fulfill requirement 4b. Visit www.adventurebase100.org (with your parent’s permission) for the schedule and for more information.
  5. Learn about the history of your unit or Scouting in your area. Interview at least two people (one from the past and one from the present) associated with your troop. These individuals could be adult unit leaders, Scouts, troop committee members, or representatives of your troop’s chartered organization. Find out when your unit was originally chartered. Create a report of your findings on the history of your troop, and present it to your patrol or troop or at a court of honor, and then add it to the troop’s library. This presentation could be in the form of an oral/written report, an exhibit, a scrapbook, or a computer presentation such as a slide show.
  6. Make a collection of some of your personal patches and other Scouting memorabilia. With their permission, you may include items borrowed from family members or friends who have been in Scouting in the past, or you may include photographs of these items. Show this collection to your counselor, and share what you have learned about items in the collection. (There is no requirement regarding how large or small this collection must be.)
  7. Reproduce the equipment for an old-time Scouting game such as those played at Brownsea Island. You may find one on your own (with your counselor’s approval), or pick one from the Scouting Heritage merit badge pamphlet. Teach and play the game with other Scouts.
  8. Interview at least three people (different from those you interviewed for requirement 5) over the age of 50 who were Scouts. Find out about their Scouting experiences. Ask about the impact that Scouting has had on their lives. Share what you learned with your counselor

Astronomy Merit BadgeAstronomy

The requirements for this badge were revised with the issuance of a new merit badge pamphlet.

Requirement 1 was reworded by splitting the sentences into items a, b, and c. A new requirement 3d was added. Requirement 5b was revised and new requirements 5c and 5d were added. Requirement 6 was deleted, and old requirements 7-10 renumbered as 6-9. The wording of requirement 6b (old 7b) was revised. The wording of the first sentence of requirement 7a (old 8a) was revised, and the second sentence moved to a new requirement 7b. Requirement 7b (old 8b) was renumbered as 7c. The wording of requirement 9 (old 10) was revised.

The revisions are as follows:

  1. Describe the proper clothing and other precautions for safely making observations at night and in cold weather. Tell how to safely observe the Sun, objects near the Sun, and the Moon. Explain first aid for injuries or illnesses, such as heat and cold reactions, dehydration, bites and stings, and damage to your eyes that could occur during observation.
    Do the following:
    1. Describe the proper clothing and other precautions for safely making observations at night and in cold weather.
    2. Tell how to safely observe the Sun, objects near the Sun, and the Moon.
    3. Explain first aid for injuries or illnesses, such as heat and cold reactions, dehydration, bites and stings, and damage to your eyes that could occur during observation.
    1. Describe the proper care and storage of telescopes and binoculars both at home and in the field.
    1. Using the Internet (with your parent's permission), books, and other resources, find Find out when each of the five most visible planets that you identified in requirement 5a will be observable in the evening sky during the next 12 months, then compile this information in the form of a chart or table. Update your chart monthly to show whether each planet will be visible during the early morning or in the evening sky.
    2. Describe the motion of the planets across the sky.
    3. Observe a planet and describe what you saw.
  2. At approximately weekly intervals, sketch the position of Venus, Mars or Jupiter in relation to the stars. Do this for at least four weeks and at the same time of night. On your sketch, record the date and time next to the planet's position. Use your sketch to explain how planets move.
    7. Do the following:
    1. Sketch the face of the moon and indicate at least five seas and five craters. Label these landmarks.
    2. Sketch the phase and the daily position of the Moon at the same hour and place, for a week four days in a row. Include landmarks on the horizon such as hills, trees, and buildings. Explain the changes you observe.
    3. List the factors that keep the Moon in orbit around Earth.
    4. With the aid of diagrams, explain the relative positions of the Sun, Earth, and the Moon at the times of lunar and solar eclipses, and at the times of new, first-quarter, full, and last-quarter phases of the Moon.
  3. 8. Do the following:
    1. Describe the composition of the Sun, its relationship to other stars, and some effects of its radiation on Earth's weather and communications. Define sunspots and describe some of the effects they may have on solar radiation.
    2. Define sunspots and describe some of the effects they may have on solar radiation.
    3. b. Identify at least one red star, one blue star, and one yellow star (other than the Sun). Explain the meaning of these colors.
  4. 9. With your counselor's approval and guidance, do ONE of the following:
    1. Visit a planetarium or astronomical observatory. Submit a written report, a scrapbook, or a video presentation afterward to your counselor that includes the following information:
      1. Activities occurring there
      2. Exhibits and displays you saw
      3. Telescopes and instruments being used
      4. Celestial objects you observed.
    2. Plan and participate in a three-hour observation session that includes using binoculars or a telescope. List the celestial objects you want to observe, and find each on a star chart or in a guidebook. Prepare an observing log or notebook. Show your plan, charts, and log or notebook to your counselor before making your observations. Review your log or notebook with your counselor afterward.
    3. Plan and host a star party for your Scout troop or other group such as your class at school. Use binoculars or a telescope to show and explain celestial objects to the group.
    4. Help an astronomy club in your community hold a star party that is open to the public.
    5. Personally take a series of photographs or digital images of the movement of the Moon, a planet, an asteroid or meteoroid , meteor, or a comet. In your visual display, label each image and include the date and time it was taken. Show all positions on a star chart or map. Show your display at school or at a troop meeting. Explain the changes you observed.
  5. 10. List at least Find out about three different career opportunities in astronomy. Pick the one you in which are most interested and explain how to prepare for such a career. Discuss with your counselor what courses might be useful for such a career Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.

Music Merit BadgeMusic

The requirements for this badge were revised with the issuance of a new merit badge pamphlet.

The introductions to requirements 3 and 4 were changed. The wording of requirement 3b was revised. Requirement 3c was moved to 4b. Requirement 3d was renumbered as 3c. Requirement 4d was moved to 3d. Requirement 4b and 4c were renumbered as 4c and 4d. New requirements 4e, 4f, and 4g were added.

New requirements 4e, 4f, and 4g incorporate most of the requirements from the Bugling Merit Badge, which was going to be discontinued in 2011, but will be retained.

The revisions are as follows:

  1. Do TWO ONE of the following:
    1. Attend a live performance, or listen to three hours of recordings from any two of the following musical styles: blues, jazz, classical, country, bluegrass, ethnic, gospel, musical theater, opera. Describe the sound of the music and the instruments used. Identify the composers or songwriters, the performers, and the titles of the pieces you heard. If it was a live performance, describe the setting and the reaction of the audience. Discuss your thoughts about the music.
    2. Interview your parents and grandparents an adult member of your family about music. Find out what the most popular music was when they he or she was your age. Find out what their his or her favorite music is now, and listen to three favorite tunes with them him or her. How do their those favorites sound to you? Had you ever heard any of them? Play three of your favorite songs for them him or her, and explain why you like these songs. Ask them what they he or she thinks of your favorite music.
    3. Serve for six months as a member of a school band, choir, or other local musical group; or perform as a soloist in public six times.
      d. List five people who are important in the history of American music and explain to your counselor why they continue to be influential. Include at least one composer, one performer, one innovator, and one person born more than 100 years ago.
    4. Catalog your own or your family's collection of 12 or more compact discs, tapes, records, or other recorded music. Show how to handle and store them.
  2. Do ONE TWO of the following:
    1. Teach three songs to a group of people. Lead them in singing the songs, using proper hand motions.
    2. Serve for six months as a member of a school band, drum and bugle corps, choir, or other organized musical group, or perform as a soloist in public six times.
    3. b. Compose and write the score for a piece of music of 12 measures or more, and play this music on an instrument.
    4. c. Make a traditional instrument and learn to play it.
    5. d. Catalog your own or your family's collection of 12 or more compact discs, tapes or records. Show how to handle and store them.
      Give a brief history of the bugle, and explain how the bugle is related to other brass wind instruments. Demonstrate how the bugle makes sound, then explain how to care for, clean, and maintain a bugle.
    6. Compose a bugle call for your troop or patrol to signal a common group activity, such as assembling for mealtime or striking a campsite. Play the call that you have composed before your unit or patrol.
    7. Sound the following bugle calls: Then explain when each of these calls is used.

Note: A bugle, trumpet, or cornet may be used to meet requirements 4b (drum and bugle corps), 4e, 4f, and 4g.


This analysis was prepared as a service to Scouts and Scouters nationwide
Paul S. Wolf
Secretary
US Scouting Service Project, Inc.

Printed copies of this document may be freely distributed for use in the Scouting program, so long as the source is acknowledged, but copying the information to another web site is NOT authorized.

A PDF version of this document can be found and downloaded by clicking here.


Page updated on: February 08, 2014



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