Scouting - Fact or Fiction?

Merit Badges

Note:
References below to the "Guide to Advancement" (GTA) refer to the 2013 printing of BSA Publication 33088 (SKU 618673).
The Guide to Advancement is the official Boy Scouts of America source on advancement procedures.
References to "Boy Scout Requirements" (BSR) refer to the 2013 printing of BSA Publication 33216 (SKU 616334)
All unit committees should have copies of these two publications to avoid running into the below urban legend traps.


Statement

You can't earn a Merit Badge until you're First Class.

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

This was true in the early days of Scouting. It isn't true now. You need only be registered in the BSA as a Boy Scout to start earning merit badges.

"Though a few merit badges may have certain restrictions; short of them, any registered Scout may work on any of them at any time, as long as he has the approval of his unit leader." (GTA 7.0.0.2)


Statement

If you start a merit badge at camp, you must finish it at camp.

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

Not true, any registered merit badge counselor for that badge can elect to accept the work already completed and allow the rest of the work for him or her to sign off.


Statement

You can't get your First Aid Merit Badge until you are First Class, because you haven't taken all of the TESTS related to first aid.

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

You can start First Aid Merit Badge at any time.


Statement

You only have one year after you start a merit badge to complete it.

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

Actually, you have until you turn 18.

"Partials have no expiration except the 18th birthday." (GTA 7.0.3.3)


Statement

Similarly, Merit badge partials expire six months they are issued

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

Nope, they last until the Scout is 18. (see the previous item.)


Statement

Merit Badge Counselor applications must be approved by the Troop Committee.

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

Nope, district or council (as defined by local council rules).

"The council advancement committee is responsible for approval of all merit badge counselors before they provide services, although it is acceptable to delegate authority for this function to districts." (GTA 7.0.1.4)


Statement

You don't need to be a registered merit badge councilor to sign off a merit badge.  Similarly, the SM (or designated Scouter) in your troop can sign off on any merit badge.

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

"People serving must maintain registration with the Boy Scouts of America as merit badge counselors and be approved by the local council for each of their badges. See "Counselor Approvals and Limitations," 7.0.1.4. There are no exceptions. For example, Scoutmasters must be approved for any badge they wish to counsel or sign off in their troop." (GTA 7.0.1.1)


Statement

You have to do a board of review for each merit badge.

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

What a silly idea. In fact, Article X, Clause 13, of the Rules and Regulations of the BSA specifically states, "There shall be no board of review procedure for merit badges".

"Once a registered and approved counselor has passed a Scout on requirements for a merit badge, it cannot be taken away. Nor does unit leadership have the authority to retract approval, or take the badge away." (GTA 7.0.4.6)


Statement

The official rule is -- If merit badge requirements change while you are doing that badge you MUST earn the merit badge in accordance with the new requirements. Conversely, A scout MUST earn the merit badge under the requirements as written when he started the badge.

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

No, at the scout's option, he can continue the old requirements or use the new ones. It's HIS choice.

"What to Do When Requirements Change
"The current annual edition of Boy Scout Requirements, No. 34765, lists the official requirements. Changes usually appear first in a revised merit badge pamphlet, then become effective the next January 1 and are published in the requirements book. Unless otherwise stated there, or in the pamphlet, the following options are allowed.

  • "If Scouts have already started on a merit badge when a revision is introduced, they may switch to the new requirements or continue with the old ones until the badge is completed.
  • "If they have not already started, they may use the new requirements and the new pamphlet.
  • "If work begins before the end of the current year, they may use the old requirements and old pamphlet until the badge is completed.

"There is no time limit between starting and completing a badge, although a counselor may determine so much time has passed since any effort took place that the new requirements must be used." (GTA 7.0.4.3)


Statement

A Scout can't earn a merit badge after the BSA has eliminated the badge.

or

Merit badges are never totally retired - If you can find a counselor, find a book that has the requirements, and find the badge, you can earn some that are not officially listed right now.

Fact or Fiction

Fiction (BOTH Cases)

Comments

With regard to the first statement, He sure can, as long as he started working on the badge prior to the badge's elimination, is continuing to work on the badge, and has not yet turned 18. His troop or crew advancement committee may have a bit of difficulty finding a badge to award him, but that is a different problem.

With regard to the second statement, It's just not true.  Here's the documentation for both ccases:: 

"Discontinued Merit Badges
"Scouts may not begin working on discontinued merit badges. If actual effort has already begun by the time discontinuation becomes effective, and work actively continues, then the badge may be completed and can count toward rank advancement, but presentation of the badge itself will be subject to availability. It is a misconception that discontinued merit badges may be earned as long as the patch and requirements can be found." (GTA 7.0.4.4)


Statement

Merit badges are awarded at the next Court of Honor.

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

Not. It is up to the troop or team, but instant recognition is encouraged. Most units present the actual badge at the next meeting, and the wallet card at the next Court of Honor.


Statement

A parent may not be a merit badge counselor for their own son for eagle required merit badges.

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

No, it's usually not a good idea, but it can be done.

"(A)pproved counselors may work with and pass any member, including their own son, ward, or relative." (GTA 7.0.1.4)


Statement

A Merit Badge Counselor may only counsel 5 merit badges.

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

"There is no limit to the number of merit badges an individual may counsel except to the extent the person lacks skills and education in the subjects." (GTA 7.0.1.4)


Statement

A Merit Badge Counselor may only counsel 5 merit badges for a specific Scout.

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

"There is no limit on the number of merit badges a youth may earn from one counselor." (GTA 7.0.1.4)


Statement

A merit badge counselor can counsel his/her son ONLY if there are 3 other boys being counseled at the same time.

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

    Here are the ONLY rules on the subject:

    • Youth members must not meet one-on-one with adults. Sessions with counselors must take place where others can view the interaction, or the Scout must have a buddy: a friend, parent, guardian, brother, sister, or other relative—or better yet, another Scout working on the same badge—along with him attending the session. (GTA 7.0.3.1)
    • (A)pproved counselors may work with and pass any member, including their own son, ward, or relative. (GTA 7.0.1.4)

    So it's clear that a parent may counsel his son for any merit badges, provided he is qualified and approved to counsel the badge(s), and the only restriction is that there must be a "buddy" around, but that could be his sibling, the other parent, another relative, a friend, OR one or more other Scouts.


Statement

A troop's leaders have an obligation to re-test every merit badge earned by the Scouts, to make sure that proper standards have been maintained.

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

Once signed by the MBC, the merit badge is deemed completed; no re-test or board of review for merit badges is permitted by BSA policy. See the quotation of GTA 7.0.4.6  above.


Statement

A Merit Badge Counselor (MBC) may counsel his or her own son.

Fact or Fiction

Fact

Comments

It is a BSA policy that this may be done.  See the quotation from GTA 7.0.1.4  above.


Statement

The Scoutmaster can withhold his signature on a Scout's merit badge application if he feels the Scout isn't "ready" for a particular merit badge.

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

It is the Scout, and the Scout alone, who decides what merit badge he wishes to earn. Neither the Scoutmaster nor anyone else can arbitrarily withhold approval of a Scout's desire for a particular merit badge. The following is quoted from the 2013 Guide to Advancement:

"A few merit badges have certain restrictions, but otherwise any registered Boy Scout, Varsity Scout, or qualified Venturer or Sea Scout may work on any of them at any time. Before he begins working with a merit badge counselor, however, he is to have a discussion with his unit leader. That a discussion has been held is indicated by the unit leader’s signature on the Application for Merit Badge, No. 34124, commonly called the “blue card.” Although it is the unit leader’s responsibility to see that at least one merit badge counselor is identified from those approved and made available, the Scout may have one in mind with whom he would like to work. The unit leader and Scout should come to agreement as to who the counselor will be. Lacking agreement, the Scout must be allowed to work with the counselor of his choice, so long as the counselor is registered and has been approved by the council advancement committee. However, see “Counselor Approvals and Limitations,” 7.0.1.4, for circumstances when a unit leader may place limits on the number of merit badges that may be earned from one counselor."

"The Scout may also want to take advantage of opportunities at merit badge fairs or midways, or at rock-climbing gyms or whitewater rafting trips that provide merit badge instruction. This is also acceptable, but the Scout must still discuss the merit badge with the unit leader and get a signed blue card. Should a Scout want to change counselors, he should once again speak with the unit leader to verify that the counselor is properly registered and approved. Whatever the source, all merit badge counselors must be registered and approved for the merit badges they counsel. See “Counselor Approvals and Limitations,” 7.0.1.4, and “Registration and Reregistration,” 7.0.1.5."

"A unit leader should consider making more of the process than just providing a signature. The opportunity exists, then and there, to provide inspiration and direction in a young man’s life. Preliminary merit badge discussions can lead to conversations about talents and interests, goal setting, and the concept of “challenge by choice.” The benefits can be much like those of a well-done Scoutmaster conference."

"The discussion a Scout is to have with the unit leader is meant to be a growth-oriented and positive conversation. The unit leader should discuss any concerns related to working on the merit badge and provide appropriate counseling. It is then the Scout’s decision whether or not to proceed with the merit badge. The process is intended to inform the Scout about what he may encounter along the way, and perhaps to give him suggestions on how the work might be approached. It also has the purpose of keeping the unit leader up to date with what the members of the unit are doing." (GTA 7.0.0.3 )


Statement

A Scout can only earn merit badges from a MBC registered in his home council.

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

So long as the MBC is registered, the Council he or she is registered in is irrelevant.

"It is acceptable for a counselor registered in one council to approve merit badges for Scouts in another. This is an important consideration, especially in areas where counselors are scarce, or when Scouts are away from home and want to continue advancing." (GTA 7.0.1.1)


Statement

The prerequisite to Life Saving merit badge is Swimming merit badge

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

A bunch of years ago, this used to be the case. It isn't any longer. The sole prerequisite for Life Saving is the ability to pass the First Class swimming requirement and swim continuously for 400 yards using specific strokes.

  1. "Before doing requirements 2 through 15:
    1.  "Complete Second Class rank requirements 8a through 8c and First Class rank requirements 9a through 9c.
    2. "Swim continuously for 400 yards using each of the following strokes in a strong manner for at least 50 continuous yards: front crawl, sidestroke, breaststroke, and elementary backstroke." (BSR - Lifesaving merit badge requirements)

Statement

To help its Scouts advance, troops should be sure to hold merit badge classes in troop meetings.

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

The TROOP MEETING PLAN, which has been the same for decades, has no provision in it for merit badge classes.


Statement

The primary purpose of merit badges is to advance to Star, Life, and Eagle.

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

The merit badge program is created to (a) offer a Scout exposure to an area of interest that may become his profession or life-long hobby, and (b) to expose him to interaction with adults with whom he is not readily familiar, for the purpose of growth in inter-personal relations.

"The Benefits of Merit Badges
"There is more to merit badges than simply providing opportunities to learn skills. There is more to them than an introduction to lifetime hobbies, or the inspiration to pursue a career—though these invaluable results occur regularly. The uncomplicated process—beginning in a discussion with a Scoutmaster, continuing through meetings with a counselor, and culminating in advancement and recognition—provides several learning experiences. It gives a Scout the confidence achieved through overcoming obstacles. Social skills improve. Self-reliance develops. Examples are set and followed. And fields of study and interest are explored beyond the limits of the school classroom." (GTA 7.0.0.1)

"(W)e often teach young people the importance of broadening horizons. Scouts meeting with counselors beyond their families and beyond even their own units are doing that. They will benefit from the perspectives of many "teachers" and will learn more as a result. They should be encouraged to reach out." (GTA 7.0.1.4)


Statement

A merit badge requirement can be changed if, in the judgment of a qualified counselor, an enhancement to the basic skill is more practical or a better learning experience.

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

A Merit Badge Counselor may certainly "teach beyond the requirements," for the benefit of the youth he or she is counseling; however, only the requirements precisely as written represent the standard for completing the merit badge.

"Policy on Unauthorized Changes to Advancement Program
"No council, committee, district, unit, or individual has the authority to add to, or subtract from, advancement requirements. There are limited exceptions relating only to youth members with disabilities." (GTA - page 2)


Statement

The specific order of events for earning a Merit Badge are: (1) the Scout picks a subject, (2) he gets a signed Merit Badge Application ("Blue Card") from his Scoutmaster, (3) he meets with a Counselor, (4) he begins fulfilling requirements.

Fact or Fiction

Fact

Comments

"Introduction to Merit Badges;

"Pick a Subject.
"Talk to your unit leader about your interests. Read the requirements of the merit badges you think might interest you, and pick one to earn. Your leader will give you the name of a person from a list of counselors. These individuals have special knowledge in their merit badge subjects and are interested in helping you.

"Scout Buddy System.
"You must have another person with you at each meeting with the merit badge counselor. This person can be another Scout, your parents or guardian, a brother or sister, a relative, or a friend.

"Call the Merit Badge Counselor.
"Get a signed Application for Merit Badge, No. 34124, from your unit leader. Get in touch with the merit badge counselor and explain that you want to earn the badge. The counselor may ask to meet you to explain what is expected and to start helping you meet the requirements. You should also discuss work you have already started or possibly completed.
"At the first meeting, you and your merit badge counselor will review and may start working on the requirements. In some cases, you may share the work you have already started or completed.
"Unless otherwise specified, work on a requirement can be started at any time. Ask your counselor to help you learn the things you need to know or do. You should read the merit badge pamphlet on the subject. Many troops, schools, and public libraries have them.
("All merit badge requirements must be met while a registered Boy Scout or Varsity Scout, or a qualified Venturer or Sea Scout. Accomplishments before joining, or while a Cub Scout, do not apply.)

"Show Your Stuff.
"When you are ready, call the counselor again to make an appointment. When you go, take along the things you have made to meet the requirements. If they are too big to move, take pictures or have an adult tell in writing what you have done. The counselor will test you on each requirement to make sure you know your stuff and have done or can do the things required."

"Get the Badge.
"When the counselor is satisfied you have met each requirement, he or she will sign your application. Give the signed application to your unit leader so your merit badge emblem can be secured for you."

"Requirements.
"You are expected to meet the requirements as they are stated—no more and no less. You must do exactly what is stated in the requirements. If it says "show or demonstrate," that is what you must do. Just telling about it isn't enough. The same thing holds true for such words as "make," "list," "in the field," and "collect," "identify," and "label." " (BSR - pages 20 - 21 except the clause in italics which is from GTA 7.0.0.1)


Statement

Merit Badges operate on a "pass-fail" system.

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

Merit badge requirements are to be completed; not "passed." When a Scout has completed all of the requirements, he has earned the merit badge. The Merit Badge Counselor's obligation is to assure that the Scout successfully completes all requirements by counseling, coaching, and mentoring him along the way.


Statement

A Merit Badge Counselor can't counsel a relative (brother, cousin, son, etc.)

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

Nope - just not true! see above


Statement

If a Sea Scout or Venturer completes all the requirements for a merit badge (e.g., Swimming), the merit badge itself should be awarded, regardless of gender.

Fact or Fiction

Both Fact and Fiction

Comments

Fiction: Because Sea Scouting is a part of the overall Venturing program for older youth, it is eligible to be co-ed, and female Sea Scouts are eligible to earn the Apprentice, Ordinary, Able, and Quartermaster ranks. Along the way, completing the requirements for some Boy Scout merit badges is to be accomplished, and the BSA is specific in wording: "Complete the requirements for "X" merit badge;" not "earn the ‘X' merit badge." So while working toward Sea Scout ranks, Sea Scouts may not earn nor be awarded merit badges.

Fact: The exception to the above rule is this:
"Boy Scout Advancement in Venturing and Sea Scouts
"Venturers and Sea Scouts who earned First Class rank as registered Boy Scouts or Varsity Scouts are qualified until their 18th birthday to continue with Boy Scout advancement. If desired, they can maintain multiple (dual) registration in a troop or team, and also in a crew or ship, and work on ranks in either unit. Wherever the member is registered, the Scoutmaster and crew Advisor or Skipper decide with the young man which one will oversee his advancement. If the Advisor or Skipper does so, but is unfamiliar with Boy Scouting, the district advancement committee should identify an experienced Scouter to assist. It is important for Venturing and Sea Scout leaders to understand that Boy Scout advancement procedures must be followed.
Any work done while a Venturer or Sea Scout can count toward both Boy Scout and Venturing or Sea Scout advancement at the same time. For instance, a conservation project required in Boy Scouting can also count in Venturing. Position of responsibility requirements for Boy Scout ranks may be met by the Venturer or Sea Scout serving in crew or ship positions as outlined in the Boy Scout Requirements book, No. 34765. The Advisor or Skipper conducts the unit leader conference. The crew or ship committee conducts Star and Life boards of review, and Eagle Scout boards follow the local council's established procedure." (GTA 4.3.1.4)

So eligible Venturers or Sea Scouts who are working on Boy Scout advancement (but not Venturers or Sea Scouts who are not doing so) may earn and be awarded merit badges.


Statement

A merit badge "partial" is good until the Scout is 18 years old.

Fact or Fiction

Fact

Comments

The 18th birthday is the only restriction on merit badge partials. A Scout may pick up where he left off at any time up until then.

"A subsequent counselor may choose not to accept partial work, but this should be rare. A Scout, if he believes he is being treated unfairly, may work with his Scoutmaster to find another counselor. ... Partials have no expiration except the 18th birthday." (GTA 7.0.3.3)


Statement

A "partial" more than 12 months old should be entirely re-tested.

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

See the previous answer


Statement

Swimming merit badge is required before a Scout can take Canoeing merit badge.

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

This used to be the case, back in the days of buggy-whips. Today, successful completion of the First Class swimming requirements is the prerequisite for Canoeing merit badge.

"3. Before doing the following requirements, successfully complete the BSA swimmer test;" (BSR- Canoeing merit badge requirements)


Statement

Requirements can be changed for a Scout who has a physical handicap that prevents him from completing the requirements as stated.

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

The BSA has very specific provisions for Scouts with physical and/or mental impediments.  See GSR pages 13 and 18, and the following from GTA. Also see Scouting for Youth With Disabilities Manual BSA Publication 34059

"Advancement for Boy Scouts and Varsity Scouts With Disabilities
"Members must meet current advancement requirements as written for merit badges, all ranks, and Eagle Palms, although some allowable substitutions or alternatives are specifically set forth in official literature. The member is expected to meet the requirements—no more and no less—and he is to do exactly what is stated. If it says, "Show or demonstrate," that is what he must do; just "telling" isn't enough. The same holds for words and phrases such as "make," "list," "in the field," "collect," "identify," and "label." Requests for alternate requirements for Tenderfoot, Second Class, and First Class ranks can be made using the information outlined below. " (GTA 10.2.2.0)

"Using Alternative Requirements
"A degree of modification in advancement requirements may be necessary to mainstream as many members with disabilities as possible. Thus a Scout with a permanent physical or mental disability (or a disability expected to last more than two years or beyond the 18th birthday) who is unable to complete all the requirements for Tenderfoot, Second Class, or First Class rank may, with his parent or guardian, submit a request to the council advancement committee to complete alternative requirements. Unless a Scout has been approved to register beyond the age of eligibility, then alternative requirements must be completed by the 18th birthday. The procedures appear below. This avenue is also available to youth with longer-term disabilities (such as those related to a severe injury) who want to continue advancing during recovery. Simple modifications very close to existing requirements need not be approved. A Scout in a wheelchair, for example, may meet the requirements for hiking by "wheeling" to a place of interest. Allowing more time and permitting special aids are also ways leaders can help Scouts with disabilities make progress. Modifications, however, must provide a very similar challenge and learning experience." (GTA 10.2.2.1)

"Alternative Merit Badges for Eagle Scout Rank
"
Though individual requirements for merit badges may not be modified or substituted, youth with disabilities may be approved for alternative badges they can complete. This is allowable on the basis of one entire badge for another. To qualify, a Scout or qualified Venturer or Sea Scout must have a permanent physical or mental disability, or a disability expected to last more than two years, or beyond age 18. The member does not need to be registered beyond the age of eligibility with a disability code. Before applying, he must earn as many of the Eagle required merit badges as possible. Any alternates must present the same challenge and learning level as those they replace, and must be completed by the 18th birthday. If physical activity is involved, a physician must approve it." (GTA 10.2.2.3)


Statement

Merit badge tasks completed before the Scoutmaster has signed the "blue card" can be accepted so long as they match the merit badge's requirements.

Fact or Fiction

Fact

Comments

It's up to the Counselor whether to accept work done in advance. Examples are Stamp & Coin Collections, Camping, a family tree for Genealogy, etc.

"You should also discuss work you have already started or possibly completed.  At the first meeting, you and your merit badge counselor will review and may start working on the requirements. In some cases, you may share the work you have already started or completed. ... Unless otherwise specified, work on a requirement can be started at any time." (BSR - page 21)

"All merit badge requirements must be met while a registered Boy Scout or Varsity Scout, or a qualified Venturer or Sea Scout. Accomplishments before joining, or while a Cub Scout, do not apply." (GTA 7.0.0.1)

"(A) counselor may choose not to accept partial work, but this should be rare. A Scout, if he believes he is being treated unfairly, may work with his Scoutmaster to find another counselor. ... Partials have no expiration except the 18th birthday." (GTA 7.0.3.3)


Statement

It's important to be known as a "tough" Merit Badge Counselor, so that you get dedicated Scouts, willing to do more than just the minimum requirements to earn the Merit Badge you handle.

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

To be blunt, this is nonsense. First, there's no such thing in Scouting as "minimum requirements." There are requirements, period. Second, the notion of being "tough" may belong in Parris Island or Quantico or some other boot camp, but it has no place in Scouting.


Statement

If the Scout camp can't accommodate all of the requirements of a Merit Badge, the Directors may change the requirements to fit the camp's capabilities.

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

The requirements for all ranks and merit badges are as written by the BSA and are unalterable.

"Policy on Unauthorized Changes to Advancement Program
"No council, committee, district, unit, or individual has the authority to add to, or subtract from, advancement requirements. There are limited exceptions relating only to youth members with disabilities." (GTA - page 2)

"Statement on Unauthorized Changes to Advancement
"Though stated earlier in this publication, it bears repeating here: No council, committee, district, unit, or individual has the authority to add to or subtract from advancement requirements. There are no camp-related exemptions except those described in "Advancement for Members With Special Needs," 10.0.0.0. Camp counselors and those assisting them, regardless the circumstances, must comply. If requirements as written cannot be completed at camp, they must be done elsewhere. The Application for Merit Badge "blue card" (see "Unit Leader Signs Application for Merit Badge," 7.0.0.2) has space to record and initial what is finished, and age 18 is the only limit to finishing partials." (GTA 5.0.1.4)


Statement

If a Scout has attended all summer camp merit badge sessions, and participates in a general review of the group's knowledge by the Merit Badge Counselor, he should be considered to have completed the requirements.

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

Merit Badge Counselors, even in summer camp, are expected to assure that every individual Scout possesses the skills and knowledge a merit badge's requirements specify; no "group final exam" is appropriate.

"Instruction may take place in group settings, but it must be done in accordance with the procedures described in "Group Instruction," 7.0.3.2." (GTA 5.0.1.3)

"There must be attention to each individual's projects and his fulfillment of all requirements. We must know that every Scout — actually and personally — completed them. If, for example, a requirement uses words like "show," "demonstrate," or "discuss," then every Scout must do that. It is unacceptable to award badges on the basis of sitting in classrooms watching demonstrations, or remaining silent during discussions." (GTA 7.0.3.2)


Statement

Teaching skills "beyond the requirements" is permissible so long as these are not included as "additional requirements."

Fact or Fiction

Fact

Comments

This provides a Merit Badge Counselor with a wonderful opportunity to pass along his or her unique knowledge of the subject matter!


Statement

"Group" Merit Badge counseling, such as in Scout summer camps, is encouraged so long as each individual Scout in the group receives personal, individual attention, and fulfilling requirements is managed on an individual and not group basis.

Fact or Fiction

Fact

Comments

Merit Badge Counselors, even in summer camp, are expected to assure that every individual Scout possesses the skills and knowledge a merit badge's requirements specify; no "group final exam" is appropriate.

"There must be attention to each individual's projects and his fulfillment of all requirements. We must know that every Scout — actually and personally — completed them. If, for example, a requirement uses words like "show," "demonstrate," or "discuss," then every Scout must do that. It is unacceptable to award badges on the basis of sitting in classrooms watching demonstrations, or remaining silent during discussions." (GTA 7.0.3.2)


Statement

Scouts really enjoy going to classes in summer camp.

Fact or Fiction

Fiction

Comments

When we turn this unique program into "Scout School", we repudiate its most fundamental philosophical underpinning.






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