Cub Scout Sports

Swimming Belt Loop

Swimming


The requirements listed below are taken from the
Cub Scout Academics and Sports Program Guide (34299 - 2009 Printing).

Requirements were revised since the previous edition - (34299B - 2006 Revision).
Click here to see the previous requirements.


Webelos Scouts that earn the Swimming Belt Loop while a Webelos Scout
also satisfy requirement 8 for the Aquanaut Activity Badge
and part of requirement 3 for the Sportsman Activity Badge.

Requirements

Tiger Cubs, Cub Scouts, and Webelos Scouts may complete requirements in a family, den, pack, school, or community environment. Tiger Cubs must work with their parents or adult partners. Parents and partners do not earn loops or pins.

Belt Loop

Complete these three requirements:

  1. Explain rules of Safe Swim Defense. Emphasize the buddy system.
  2. Play a recreational game in the water with your den, pack, or family.
  3. While holding a kick board, propel yourself 25 feet using a flutter kick across the shallow end of the swimming area

Sports Pin

Earn the Swimming belt loop, and complete five of the following requirements:

  1. Practice the breathing motion of the crawl stroke while standing in shallow water. Take a breath, place your head in the water, exhale, and turn your head to the side to take a breath. Repeat.
  2. Learn and demonstrate two of the following strokes: crawl, backstroke, elementary backstroke, sidestroke, or breaststroke.
  3. Learn and demonstrate two of the following floating skills: prone, facedown float, and back float. The purpose of the float is to provide the swimmer the opportunity to rest in the water.
  4. Using a kickboard, demonstrate three kinds of kicks.
  5. Pass the "beginner" or "swimmer" swim level test.
  6. Visit with a lifeguard and talk about swimming safety in various situations (pool, lake, river, ocean). Learn about the training a lifeguard needs for his or her position.
  7. Explain the four rescue techniques: Reach, Throw, Row, and Go (with support)
  8. Take swimming lessons.
  9. Attend a swim meet at a school or community pool.
  10. Tread water for 30 seconds.
  11. Learn about a U.S. swimmer who has earned a medal in the Olympics. Tell your den or an adult family member what you learned about him or her.
  12. Demonstrate the proper use of a mask and snorkel in a swimming area where your feet can touch the bottom

Swimming activities done by Cub Scout Packs must be done in accordance with the rules in the "Safe Swim Defense", described in the Guide to Safe Scouting (#34416B). That program is available for viewing by Clicking here. Those rules are not mandatory for individuals or families, of course, swimming in private or public pools, lakes, or beaches, although families are encouraged to use as much of them as appropriate. They ARE mandatory for all Cub Scout aquatic activities, trips to swimming pools arranged as Den or Pack meetings or outings.

Included in the Guide is a procedure and standards for classifying swimming ability. Requirement 2 for the Swimming Belt Loop, listed above, refers to the following, taken from the Guide.

Beginner Test

Jump feet first into water over the head in depth, level off, swim 25 feet on the surface, stop, turn sharply, resume swimming as before, and return to starting place.

The entry and turn serve the same purpose as in the swimmer test. The swimming can be done with any stroke, but no underwater swimming is permitted. The stop assures that the swimmer can regain a stroke if it is interrupted. The test demonstrates that the beginning swimmer is ready to learn deepwater skills and has the minimum ability required for safe swimming in a confined area in which shallow water, sides, or other support is less than 25 feet from any point in the water.

Swimmer Test

The swimmer test demonstrates the minimum level of swimming ability required for safe deep-water swimming. The various components of the test evaluate the several skills essential to this minimum level of swimming ability:

Jump feetfirst into water over your head in depth. Swim 75 yards in a strong manner using one or more of the following strokes: sidestroke, breaststroke, trudgen, or crawl; then swim 25 yards using an easy, resting backstroke. The 100 yards must be swum continuously and include at least one sharp turn. After completing the swim, rest by floating.

The test administrator must objectively evaluate the individual performance of the test, and in so doing should keep in mind the purpose of each test element.

  1. "Jump feetfirst into water over your in depth, ...
    The swimmer must be able to make an abrupt entry into deep water and begin swimming without any aids. Walking in from shallow water, easing in from the edge or down a ladder, pushing off from side or bottom, and gaining forward momentum by diving do not satisfy this requirement.
  2. "...Swim 75 yards in a strong manner using one or more of the following strokes: sidestroke, breaststroke, trudgen, or crawl..."
    The swimmer must be able to cover distance with a strong, confident stroke. The 75 yards must not be the outer limit of the swimmer's ability; completion of the distance should show sufficient stamina to avoid undue risks. Dog-paddling and strokes repeatedly interrupted and restarted are not sufficient; underwater swimming is not permitted. The itemized strokes are inclusive. Any strong side or breaststroke or any strong overarm stroke (including the back crawl) is acceptable.
  3. "...swim 25 yards using an easy, resting backstroke..."
    The swimmer must perform a restful, free-breathing backstroke that can be used to avoid exhaustion during swimming activity. This element of the test necessarily follows the more strenuous swimming activity to show that the swimmer is, in fact, able to use the backstroke as a relief from exertion. The change of stroke must be accomplished in deep water without any push-off or other aid. Any variation of the elementary backstroke may suffice if it clearly allows the swimmer to rest and regain wind.
  4. "...The 100 yards must be swum continuously and include at least one sharp turn..."
    The total distance is to be covered without rest stops. The sharp turn demonstrates the swimmer's ability to reverse direction in deep water without assistance or push-off from side or bottom.
  5. "...After completing the swim, rest by floating."
    This critically important part of the test evaluates the swimmer's ability to maintain himself in the water indefinitely even though exhausted or otherwise unable to continue swimming. Treading water or swimming in place will further tire the swimmer and therefore is unacceptable. The duration of the float test is not significant, except that it must be long enough for the test administrator to determine that the swimmer is resting and likely could continue to do so for a prolonged period. Drownproofing may be sufficient if clearly restful, but it is not preferred. If the test is completed except for the floating requirement, the swimmer may be retested on the floating only (after instruction) provided that the test administrator is confident that the swimmer can initiate the float when exhausted.
Worksheets for use in working on these requirements: Word Format PDF Format

Blanks in this worksheets table appear when we do not have a worksheet for the loop and pin that includes these requirements.


Page updated on: June 01, 2013



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