Bridging Ceremonies

For Webelos To Boy Scouts

Edited from various Internet Sources

By Rik Bergethon

 

Introduction

The following pages are by no means my original work. In this day and age, you simply put out a request to a news group (a resource) and search the Internet (another resource) for what you need, put it all together, and you have this new product (this resource). You cannot call this a finished product, because somebody will always save this, add to it and republish it at a later date; another resource. In other works, I have had other Scouters tell me they missed my original request, and would like to add this or that to what I had. We are an ever-growing resource.
 
Where I could, the author or source is cited, but many of these ceremonies already cited an "unknown Scout Leader" as the author. Some of these are just the basic outlines or ideas, some are rather complete scripts; they are mixed together. The biggest sources are two internet sites: Macscouter.com and USSCOUTS.org. Some sources are from a council's pow wow book and other, a Cub Scout Pack's web site.
 
This information or resource is no good to anybody unless you share it, with another Scouter, another leader or within your district or council. Read, enjoy, share, edit, add to it and have fun. Remember, KISMIF!
 
My thanks to all the Scouters and sources whose services and works I used.




NUTS AND BOLTS OF CEREMONIES



Ceremony Recipes

You know when you go to a party and someone brings a dish that you thought you just loved and then you try to find out what person brought that dish. Well preparing ceremonies can achieve the same kind of results. With a little planning and creativity.



The What's and Why's of Ceremonies



Ceremonies are a means of recognition, creating a setting for your theme or sending out a special thought.



A.    Recognizing the boys, parents, helpers of your program and speakers that come to your unit. Everyone needs a "pat on the back."

B.     Creating a setting for your theme by the use of opening, advancement, recognition and closing ceremonies.

C.    Special messages are a time during your program that you want to get a point across: i.e. Cubmasters Minute.

 

When To Do Ceremonies



Ceremonies can be done at anytime. When a boy overcomes a hurdle that he has been trying to get across. When a boy receives an award or advancement.  When someone helps out at meetings. A place that your unit visits.



You should recognize people as soon as possible. Remember if a boy has achieved something and has an award coming he is expecting to receive it soon. But the unexpected is the most appreciated and fun to receive.



Where To Do Ceremonies



Ceremonies can be done almost anywhere. In den meetings, pack meetings, outdoors, church services or places of business. Use your imagination.



Who Does Ceremonies?



Just as before in where you do ceremonies, this can also be done in the same manner. In other words anyone can do a ceremony. Just as long as it is done properly and considerately. The boys can recognize each other, they can recognize a leader, leaders recognizing parents that help out and you may want to put on a ceremony for a place of business that you may visit. A place of business may want to recognize your unit for coming and touring their facility.



Now that we know that a ceremony is a way of recognizing something or someone, let's look at the ingredients of this recipe.



The Recipe for Ceremonies



ACTION - Use as many people as possible and props as needed.



COORDINATION - Plan ahead and practice it a few times. If others will participate, tell them in advance what you expect from them.



DELEGATION - Rely on your assistants and others. Don't try to do it all yourself.



DIGNITY - Allow no horseplay or action that will interfere with the ceremony.



IMAGINATION - Use showmanship and use materials easily found. If you're using a prepared ceremony, change the words to fit your own style of speaking. Try to work within the framework provided by your monthly theme.



PARTICIPATION - Get the leaders involved with sons. Use Den Chiefs and Den Leaders with their boys.



SIMPLICITY - Remember the basic rule of Scouting - K.I.S.M.I.F - Keep It Simple, Make It Fun.



VARIETY - Don't use the same ceremony too often in pack or den meetings. Remember repetition can become boring and will tend to lose people's interest.



PROPER STAGING - Keep the speaking to a minimum and caution the boys to speak up. If you have access to a public address system, USE IT. Have props ready and badges in correct order to enable boys or leaders to get them without confusion. Have the "stage" elevated, if possible, so that the audience can see and appreciate the ceremony.



CONCERN - Think of others when planning your ceremony. Many families would like to take photographs of their son's ceremonies. If your ceremony involves candles and darkness, plan to turn the lights back on before handing out the awards. If anyone wants to take pictures, notify them of your plans son they can adjust their cameras accordingly.



Webelos GRADUATION #1



Participants: Cubmaster (CM), Webelos Leader (WL), Scoutmaster (SM), Den Chief (DC), Senior Patrol Leader (SPL), Patrol Leader (PL), Graduating Webelos Scouts.



Equipment: Rustic Bridge with railings, (4) Candle Scout Emblem Lanterns, (As Appropriate) Scout Badges, Red Shoulder Loops, Scout Neckerchief, Scout Handbook,



WL: Hello, Scouts of _____________(Local Council Summer Camp Name)



SM: Hello, Webelos Scouts of Akela's Council ring of _________________(Local Council Summer Camp Name)



CM: We have ______(number) of Webelos Scouts from Akela's Council Ring who have prepared themselves for entrance into the council ring of ______________(Local Council Summer Camp Name)



SM: Bring the Webelos Scouts and their parents to the bridge (DC and WL lead graduating Webelos and parents to bridge)



WL: All of you have contributed much to your den and to the Pack. Now you are leaving to enter a Scout Troop of your choosing. There we are sure, you will continue to grow in your Scouting skills and friendships.



DC: Two important parts of your Webelos Scout uniform are your neckerchief and colors. These items were bestowed upon you when you became a member of the Webelos Patrol (Den). They identified you as a Webelos Scout. Tonight you will be making a transition.



CM: Tonight you will be leaving Akela's Council ring, and Cub Scouting. As a symbol of this departure and the growth of your son(s) may I ask that each of them stand before me where I may remove his neckerchief and colors.



(CM removes neckerchief and colors hands to parents.)



Now you and your son may cross over the bridge into Boy Scouting pausing briefly at the other end to be welcomed by Scoutmaster ___________(name) and his Senior Patrol Leader __________(name) of Troop _______(number).



SM: As Scoutmaster of Troop _______(number) it is indeed a pleasure for me to welcome you and your parents into the troop. Now that you have crossed over the bridge into Scout Troop ______(number), my Senior Patrol Leader has one more item that requires changing on your uniform, your shoulder loops.



SPL: When you crossed over the bridge between our Council rings you became a Boy Scout. A Boy Scout wears red shoulder loops. Now it is my pleasure to present you with a set of red shoulder loops to complete your transition into Boy Scout Troop _______(number). May you wear them with pride, for that is the color that all Boy Scouts wear nationwide.



(SPL and PL remove blue shoulder loops and replace with red loops hand blue loops to parents)



WL: (The New 2nd year Webelos Patrol gives their graduated brothers a rousing Patrol (Den) Cheer)

 

BRIDGING Webelos TO SCOUTS



Personnel: Cubmaster (CM), Webelos Leader (WL), Den Chief (DC), Scoutmaster (SM), Boy Scout candidates and their parents.



Equipment: American flag, pack flag, troop flag, bridge, troop neckerchief for each Scout.



Setting: The bridge is in place in center of stage area, pack flag is to the left of the bridge, the American flag and troop flag to the right. Candidates and parents are to the far left, to be escorted to front.



CM: The main goal of Cub Scouting is to prepare boys to become Boy Scouts. Tonight, it is my privilege to present to you our Cub Scouts that have decided to continue their Scouting trail. (Call forward each candidate by name and their parents.)



This ceremony of crossing the bridge marks your completion in Cub Scouting, just as it marks the beginning of a whole new experience in Boy Scouting. Congratulations and good luck!



(As each candidate approaches the bridge, the WL and DC remove the Webelos neckerchief and hands it to the Scout's parents. CM gives each the Cub Scout handshake. Candidates and his parents cross over bridge together. SM gives candidate the Scout handshake and welcomes him and his parents to the troop.)



SM: We are happy to welcome you to our troop. (Give a short statement of what is expected of Scout.) Please repeat after me the Scout Oath. As a token of this important occasion, I would like to present you with the troop neckerchief. (After each have received their neckerchief, the Scoutmaster and new Scouts exchange the Boy Scout salute. All participants leave the stage area.)



CROSS OVER THE BRIDGE CEREMONY



Props: Bridge, Boy Scout Handbooks



CM: Tonight we have Cub Scouts who will embark on a new adventure in Scouting. Will those Scouts of Akela gather with their parents over on the left side of the bridge?



CM: (to parents) During the years you and your sons have been in Cub Scouting, we have had numerous opportunities to work together along your trail. Your boys have reached the age to enter Boy Scouting. I'm sure you and your sons will find the same satisfactions there that you found in Cub Scouting. As a symbol of the growth of your sons and their entrance into Boy Scouting, I will ask that you lead them before me and prepare to guide them across the bridge into Boy Scouting when I obtain permission for your sons to enter their council camp.



CM: Hello! Scouts of Troops!



SM: Hello! Cub Scouts of Akela! What do you desire?



CM: I have Cub Scouts of Akela's council ring who have prepared themselves for entrance into the council rings of Troop(s) _____ and who all wear Cub Scouting's highest award, the Arrow of Light.



SM: Bring them forward to the bridge that joins our council rings. (Lead parents and boys to the bridge. Scoutmasters cross the bridge and are introduced to parents and boys.)



CM: Boys, it has been a sincere pleasure knowing and working with you. In a few moments you will no longer be Webelos Scouts. I hope and pray that the desire, eagerness, interest and free spirit you have shown in Cub Scouting carries over into your families, church, school room, circle of friends, and everything you do in your lives.



The trail to Eagle still lies ahead of you. It takes a strong desire, a willingness to sacrifice, and a lot of guts sprinkled with a lot of love, to make it. So, this is just the starting point. Keep the fire going, and the desire going within you and from this base camp. May your travels be onward and upward and may you have a marvelous journey toward being a successful, active, contributing citizen of the community.



Boys, you have contributed much to your den and pack; and we shall miss you and your parents. You leave us to enter the Scout Troop of your choice. There, I'm sure, you'll continue to grow in Scouting skills and friendships.



Now that you are leaving our pack and Cub Scouting, will you remove your neckerchiefs and give them to your parents. Your new Scoutmaster will soon present you with a token of your status as new Boy Scouts. As you leave our council ring, I would like to present to you a token to start you on your new path (present Boy Scout handbook to each boy.) Now cross over the bridge and join your new council ring.



(Scouts and parents follow the Scoutmaster(s) across the bridge.)



SM: As Scoutmaster of Troop ___, I welcome you and your parents. There are many traditions in our troop, so many that we would not attempt to relate them all to you now. Instead, it is our pleasure to present you with this token of our council ring. (Present boys with neckerchiefs. Have other Boy Scouts place them around their necks.) Wear it with pride as many have done before you. We welcome you to our troop with your first official handshake.



(This is followed by the Scoutmaster and new Boy Scouts repeating the Scout Oath together.)



 

A Bridging Ceremony from Troop 6, Colonial Virginia Council

A darkened room, a single candle burning on a table. The Webelos Scouts (their parents behind them) are lined up near the Scoutmaster who is standing beside the flame.



SM: "The flame you see before you represents the Flame of Knowledge. You Webelos Scouts who are bridging over to Boy Scouts have shown me that you bring with you a hunger for Knowledge. The Scouting program offers you a special kind of knowledge that will serve you well as you walk the sometimes difficult Road to Manhood."



SM takes up another candle from the table where the Flame of Knowledge sits and holds it near the Flame but does not light it yet.



SM: "The Flame of Knowledge never goes out as long as there are people who are willing to seek knowledge. It burns eternally in the mind of Humankind as a beacon, casting it's rays to guide us as we seek a higher level of understanding or our world."



SM lights candle, saying: "This candle represents a Youth who seeks knowledge. Each of you Webelos here with me tonight is that Youth."



SM hands the newly-lit candle to the nearest Webelos Scout, saying: "You have sought to continue building upon your Scouting knowledge by finding a Boy Scout Troop that will help you gain your ample portion of this special knowledge. Take custody of the Flame." [Places candle in the>closest boy's hand.] "Hold this sacred Flame for a moment and then transfer this Flame to the next Webelos Scout. Hand it around from boy to boy until it reaches the last one of you in line who will return it to me."



As the Flame is transferred from Scout to Scout, the SM continues talking to the assembly, saying: "Knowledge, once gained, must be shared. Each Boy Scout must pass on to other Scouts what he has learned. As you grow more experienced in Scouting, we will ask you to begin to return to Scouting some of what you have received from it. Work diligently as you pass down your Trail to Eagle Scout and you will learn much that you can share with the others who come after you. Remember, you will receive from Scouting only what you put into it. I challenge you to work hard so that you will have much to give back."



When the candle has made it's way back to the SM, he places the second candle in a holder that was placed well away from the original Flame. After a moment, he blows out the second candle. NOTE: The Flame of Knowledge is left burning as long as possible.



SM: "See how easily that Youth's Flame was extinguished by the Breeze of Laziness? Don't let Laziness extinguish the Flame of Knowledge that burns in your own mind. Cherish your Flame by doing your best, by asking questions when you don't understand, and by living up to the Scout Oath and Law." [Pause for effect.] "But, notice how the Flame of Knowledge that burns in the mind of Humankind is still lit? From it you may always re-light your own flame should the Breeze of Laziness blow too hard and snuff out your own Flame. Never stop learning. Never give the Breeze Laziness a chance to blow."



Now the Troop's SPL, who has been standing in the middle of a plywood bridge with an ASPL, calls across to the Webelos Scouts and their parents, "Troop 6 invites the Webelos Scouts and their parents to join us on the Boy Scout side of Scouting by crossing over this symbolic bridge."



As the Webelos reach the middle of the span the SPL and his assistant stop him to remove the boy's blue shoulder flashes and replace them with red ones his parent offers up behind the boy's back. After the red flashes are in place, the SPL then places the Troop's neckerchief OVER the boy's Webelos version, removes the boy's slide, puts it on the Troop neckerchief, and then slides away the old neckerchief. [Handing it and the blue loops off to a parent.]



As the SPL removes the FIRST neckerchief the SM says, "Notice that we removed the Webelos neckerchief after we've placed the Boy Scout neckerchief on the Scout. We do this to be sure that there is no break in a boy's Scouting career."



As the new Boy Scout exits the bridge, he is welcomed by his new Troop's Assistant SM who's in charge of the New Scout Patrol, and by as many other boy leaders as the Troop can muster that evening. The parents are likewise greeted.



When all have bridged over, the SA asks the new Boy Scouts to take hold of the Troop flag with their left hand and raise the Scout sign with their right. He leads them in the Scout Oath, and the ceremony is over.



Thanks to Andrew Hagemann



Broken Arrow AOL

 

Equipment: An Arrow for each boy, two council fires, awards



Setting: Cubmaster at first fire, boy scouts at second. Award is attached to arrow.



Akela: Will (Read names) and their parents please come forward and take their place of honor at the Council Fire? Tonight (Read names) have achieved two high honors. They will receive the Arrow of Light award and graduate from Cub Scouting into Boy Scouting.



I hold in my hand an arrow. As you can see, it is straight and true, for only an arrow that is straight and true will hit its mark. (Hold up arrow so Scout can see its shaft.) In order to fly straight, it must also have at least three feathers. These represent the first three ranks of Cub Scouting you achieved; Bobcat, Wolf and Bear. With these awards in place you began to ascend along the shaft, toward the tip of the arrow, the Arrow of Light Award. This is the culmination of all your Cub Scouting efforts. Without a hard, sharp tip, the arrow is not a very effective weapon. Since you have achieved this, the highest rank in Cub Scouting, you will now be a more effective Boy Scout as you take with you the things you've learned and continue to progress along the Scouting trail.



Please stand. I now present you with this arrow, to which is attached your award. Parents, please pin the Arrow of Light on your son. now give your parents the proper salute. (The proper salute to a mother is a kiss.)



Since you are graduating form Cub Scouting tonight, you will no longer be a Cub Scout, except in memory. Because this arrow represents the path along which you have come, but not the path along which you must now go, I will ask you to return the arrow.



(Take the arrows and break them over your knee, just enough to crack, but not completely in two.) This broken arrow will now be forever a reminder to you, that you achieved every rank in Cub Scouting, and graduated with honor. It will no longer fly, just as you will no longer be a Cub Scout. But you will always wear the Arrow of Light symbol on your uniform, as a reminder of your accomplishment. You now may keep this broken arrow for your trophy skin. I give you one last salute before you leave our council fire to join your new Boy Scout brothers at their council fire.



(Salute.) Always be straight and true! Now walk to your new council fire.



-- Written by Rick McNeal

-- Thanks to Ellen DeVilbiss

 

A Crossover Ceremony



This is the crossing over ceremony I used last year when I graduated my Webelos (including my older son) to Boy Scouts. This was separate from the Arrow of Light, which was done at the same meeting.



First you need to invite local community leaders to the ceremony. I had invited the City Manager, my Unit Commissioner, DE, Executive Officer from our sponsor and the State Senators & Representatives that serve the area where the boys live, as well as the SM, ASM & SPL from the troops the boys where joining. One Senator & one representative was unable to attend and sent the boys very nice congratulatory letters, which they were thrilled with. The state Senator even invited the boys to be pages for a day at the state capital.



You need for a prop, a bridge that the boys can walk across from stage left to stage right (my BA is Theatre). The Cubmaster and ACM stand on the stage left side of the bridge. I didn't formally announce the ceremony but asked the representatives from the first troop to come forward and stand on the other side of the bridge to welcome their new scouts. I called down one boy to the bridge and his parents joined us, standing to the left of me. The graduating Webelos stands with his back to the bridge. I turned to the boy and silently removed his "signs of Cub Scouts". First I removed his hat, handed it to my ACM to hold upside down, I then removed his neckerchief slide, placed it in the hat, then the neckerchief placed into the hat and finally the navy blue epaulets, also into the hat. I then took the hat from my ACM, turned and handed it to the mother, shook the parents hands and sent them in front of the bridge to the other side to greet their new boy scout. I turn back to the boy and my ACM shook hands with the boy using the Cub Scout handshake. I then shook the boy's hand using the Boy Scout handshake. At this point the boy turns to face the bridge and crosses over. On the other side, their SM presented the boy with his new hat (gift from the Pack), red epaulets (from the parents) and new neckerchief from the troop.



The last one I graduated was my son and since I was staying on as the CM, only his father went over to the other side to greet him. This was done as a symbolic sign of me staying with the Pack and his going on to Boy Scouts.



After each boy graduated (and I graduated all the Webelos II) I then announced "New Boy Scouts of Troop 171 and Troop 271 dismissed. All the remaining Cub Scouts stood and saluted the boys as they filed out. The new Scouts and their parents formed a receiving line at the back of the church (our sponsor) and were greeted by everyone as they left to go downstairs for cake and punch. This ceremony was simple but very effective as there wasn't a dry eye in the audience. The state representative that was able to attend was very impressed and was also teary eyed.



Crossover to Boy Scouts, by Don Tolin

 

Participants:



        All 2nd Year Webelos Scouts

        All Troop Boy Scouts

        Cubmaster Scoutmaster

        Webelos Den Chief

        Scouts' parents and families



Ceremony:



Webelos on one side of bridge working together like on activity pin, having fun. Webelos Den Flag in background. Den leaders and Den Chief with the boys. Webelos stand together and face audience. Have everyone stand. "We want to teach everyone a song we learned at Camp Buffalo Bill this summer" Sing the Beaver Song.

 

Beaver 1, beaver all, time to do the beaver call.

Beaver 2, beaver 3, let's all climb the beaver tree.

Beaver 4, beaver 5, let's all do the beaver jive.

Beaver 6, beaver 7, time to go to beaver heaven.

Beaver 8, beaver 9, STOP IT'S BEAVER TIME.



Webelos now ask everyone to join in and sing it one time together. Tell everyone to now sit down. Webelos remain standing.



When each scout is called to cross over, boys all give him high fives. The Cubmaster takes off the scout's Webelos neckerchief and

his color tabs. The Cubmaster gives remarks. The Cubmaster shakes the scout's hand. The Den Chief accompanies the scouts across the bridge. The scout's parents and family crosses also.



Boy Scouts, in the mean time, have been sitting around a campfire on the other end of the bridge. Tent in background. Troop Flag and Patrol Flags in background. 12 points of Scout Law Displayed. When the scouts and the Den Chief cross-over the bridge, the boys stand up and fall in rank. The Scoutmaster greets them, shakes hands with their parents, and greets other family members. The Scoutmaster puts the troop neckerchief on the scouts, and puts on the red shoulder loops. He shakes the boy's hand. Boy Scouts welcome new scouts. The scoutmaster gives remarks. Applause or cheer.



BOY SCOUTS SING SCOUT VESPERS AT END OF CEREMONY.



Softly falls the light of day,

While our campfire fades away.

Silently each Scout should ask:

"Have I done my daily task?

Have I kept my honor bright?

Can I guiltless sleep tonight?

Have I done and have I dared

Everything to be prepared?"



A Space Theme Crossover, by Peter Farnham



We used an outer space theme this time. I have a Captain Picard suit I wear at Halloween, and a working toy ray gun. We started out by dimming the lights and playing over the speaker system at full volume Strauss' "Thus Spake Zarathustra," more familiarly known as the theme from "200l: A Space Odyssey."



I came out and tried to light the "campfire" but had no matches. "Great Denibian slime devils, I'm out of matches!" I bellowed in my most stentorian starship commander's voice. "I'll have to speak to Riker about this immediately!" But I solve the problem by lighting the campfire with a blast from my ray gun (my ASM turned the dimmer switch up to full slowly). Then I leisurely warmed my hands, and turned around and warmed my posterior (giggles here, as intended).



Then I turned to the WDL, and said, "Commander Keith, I understand you have seven graduates from the star fleet academy who are ready to join the crews of starships 113 and 1515. Bring them up here immediately!" Anyway, you get the idea. Bring the boys up, congratulate them on their accomplishments, wish them well in boy scouting, and then cross them over the bridge, where they are received by a representative from their new troops. We also give them boy scout neckerchiefs; my troop has a custom-made one we give each new scout.



Another thing we do--I have each boy sign our cross-over bridge with an indelible magic marker before they actually cross over. Who knows? We may have a president's signature on there someday.



At the end, we played the theme from "Star Wars", also LOUD. Very inspiring.



This is a fun ceremony and seemed to work well. The boys really liked it--didn't want me to turn off "Star Wars," so we played it as a finale when they were leaving the pack meeting.



Each of the seven boys also received his Arrow of Light in a separate ceremony earlier in the meeting.









Jungle Book Ceremony for Advancing to Scouts by Edward A. Haluska



People required:



* Akela, the leader of the wolf pack (the Cubmaster)

* Scoutmaster and Boy Scouts from the patrol(s) that will be accepting the Cubs.



Props:

 

* Bridge (a small symbolic one is adequate)

* New Boy Scout scarves

* Suitable recorded music and tape player



Hints:



        It is very common for the Boy Scouts to be responsible for the crossing over ceremony. If you want to use this ceremony for crossing over, be sure to discuss it with the leaders of the Boy Scouts who will be participating.

        The music is mainly for the parents. During the crossing over, play something suitable like "Forever Young" or "Where Are You Going My Little One?"



Akela: The moon is full, just as it was long ago on that night in the jungle when Mowgli first joined the Seeonee wolf pack. It has been many years since Mowgli returned from living with the wolves. After he returned, he taught us many of the lessons he learned while in the jungle. The most important was that the strength of the wolf is the pack, and the strength of the pack is the wolf. That is why we are here tonight in this council ring. But just as Mowgli had to leave the pack, tonight we also have some man cubs among us who have grown strong and tall. The time has now come when they too must leave the pack to find their place in the world of men. They have learned many lessons as they have walked the trails of the bobcat, wolf, and bear. But tonight, because these cubs are ready to begin their next adventure on their way to manhood, we will not look to the way of the jungle for guidance. Instead, we will read from a book that men use when they seek wisdom.

 

To everything there is a season,

A time for every purpose under heaven:

A time to be born, and a time to die;

A time to plant, and a time to pluck what is planted;

A time to kill, and a time to heal;

A time to break down, and a time to build up;

A time to weep, and a time to laugh;

A time to mourn, and a time to dance;

A time to cast away stones, and a time to gather stones;

A time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing;

A time to gain, and a time to lose;

A time to keep, and a time to throw away;

A time to tear, and a time to sew;

A time to keep silent, and a time to speak;

A time to love, and a time to hate;

A time of war, and a time of peace.



Akela: We have now come to the time and season when we must let go. So let us begin. Parents, bring forward these man cubs.



(Akela calls out the names of the Cubs who will be advancing to Scouts. Parents and Cubs come forward and face the rest of the pack.)



Akela: Akela of the humans!



Scoutmaster: What is it that you want, Akela of the man cubs?



Akela: We have among us several boys who have grown tall in body and strong in character. They have learned well the ways of the pack, but now they yearn to run with other boys who are also between their childhood and manhood. They have been with the pack for many moons, and have been a source of pride for us all. But now it is now the season when they must leave us.



Scoutmaster: We understand. Bring them to the bridge between us.



(If you have recorded music, start it now.)



(Akela now leads the cubs, one at a time, to the center of the bridge between Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts. The boy is stopped at the center of the bridge, and Akela then removes the Cub's Webelos scarf and any other Cub Scout insignias. The Scouts of the patrol that the Cub will be joining then place a Boy Scout scarf on the boy and lead him to their group.)



Akela: Although these boys are no longer with our pack, we still call on the Great Akela of all Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts to always guide their way. We ask that the Great Akela watch over them as they learn to soar with the Eagles. And, in the fullness of time,

after the great wheel of life has turned full circle, when the season again comes to the time to gather in, and the moon is full, we pray that these boys will return, tall and proud and strong, and present their own man cubs to be accepted into the pack. But until then, let us send them on their way with a last wolf howl.



(Akela leads pack in wolf howl.)



Crossover Ceremony



The O/A Ceremonies advisor was the Cubmaster for the Pack. The logistics of the event may seem a bit daunting but the ceremony worked very well.



Props:



* 4 canoes

* PFD's for everyone going into the canoes



Hints:



* Make sure that you comply with the Safety Afloat requirements for qualified life guards.

* Perform this during the day

* The four winds and the chief and drummer are the O/A ceremonies team



Procedure: The Webelos Scouts have a brief ceremony in which their parents are asked to help them by putting on the PFD.



The Webelos are then lead to the end of a small pond (200m X 75m).



The Cubmaster calls to the four winds at the other end of the pond to let the crossover begin.



The drummer starts drumming, which is how the ceremony team knows it is time to paddle up to where the second ceremony is done.



The chief and four winds get out of the canoes and perform the brief ceremony.



The Webelos are then loaded into the canoes and paddled over to where the Boy Scout troop is waiting.



The troop then has their induction ceremony.



The entire crossover lasted about 45 minutes.



The Webelos and parents were awed by the ceremony.



The four winds are BSA or RC certified life guards.



-- Thanks to Jay Bemis

 

Magic Neckerchief Graduation Ceremony Script



This Ceremony is written for Webelos Graduation to Boy Scouts. With slight modification, it can be used for any level rank advancement. It is written assuming several scouts, but with minor changes could be used for a single scout.



Materials:



Neckerchief (if using Webelos neckerchief, the Webelos patch must be removed - it holds too much acetone, and will result in burning the part of the neckerchief above the patch)

2 coat hangers and 2 safety pins

1 large mouth Peanut butter jar with lid

Acetone

Water

A lighted candle or advancement log with lighted candles Fire extinguisher



Setup:



Stretch out the hangers, attach one safety pin to each.



Mix the "Magic Water" in the jar. This should be done outside with good ventilation. Keep the lid tightly closed except when dipping the neckerchief. Magic water consists of EXACTLY 40% Acetone and 60% Water (2 parts Acetone to 3 parts Water)



You will need an assistant for lights, one for handling the dipping of the neckerchief, and one off-stage with the fire extinguisher (just in case)..



When it is time to dip and burn the neckerchief, use the following procedure:



1. Attach the corners of the neckerchief to the hangers with the safety pins.



2. Lightly shake the jar of Magic Water to remix the components. Tightly wad the neckerchief and dip it completely into the jar containing the Magic Water. The whole neckerchief must be wet or the dry part will burn.



3. Squeeze out the neckerchief and quickly extend it, holding the hangers. While this is being done, the lid must be replaced for fire safety.



4. Pass the neckerchief over the flame. Make certain the neckerchief is spread between the wire holders. It cannot be rolled or folded in any part.



Make certain that the neckerchief is well in front, or off to the side of you. We used an old broom stick, with the hangars attached to it so that no one had to be real close. If you work quick enough, the whole neckerchief will appear to be engulfed in flames, and the flames will extend several inches above the top of the neckerchief.



5. Shake gently when just the edges remain burning. This will extinguish the flames along the hems, which hold more acetone than the body, due to the additional fabric here.



You must move very quickly through steps 2, 3 and 4, or the acetone will evaporate before it can be ignited. The jar of acetone must be kept away from the flame, and be covered at all times except when actually dipping the neckerchief. Acetone is highly flammable. You might want an additional assistant or two to help with this.

 

Practice the steps above outside, before the meeting to make sure that you can get it right when the time comes. It will be embarrassing if the wet neckerchief doesn't burn due to evaporation of the acetone. This trick works because the acetone burns, while the water keeps the neckerchief from burning. Remember that the acetone will evaporate pretty quickly, or you will miss the effect.



Script:



(Dim house lights gradually while calling forward the graduating cub scouts and their parents. Leave only the lights in front on while telling the story.)



Tonight Webelos Scouts _____________________ are graduating to boy scouts. Will they come forward with their parents.



These young men have completed their Cub Scouting activities. There remains but one test before they may cross the bridge into Boy Scouts.



"Have they done everything they can to BE PREPARED?"



Deep in the heart of the mountains and deserts of New Mexico, there is an Indian village along side a small stream. The village and the area around it are very green and lush. This is very unusual, for the village is in the middle of a very harsh desert land.



While hiking in the area several years ago, I came across this village and stopped by the stream for a rest. There was an old Chief sitting in the sun by the stream, and I asked him:



"Why is this area so green and your people so healthy?"



The old Chief replied:



"The waters of this stream are magical. They assist all who come, by telling the people if they have done everything they need, to be prepared. By hard work with the assistance of these magical waters, my people have done the things needed to be prepared and prosper in life."



I thought for a while and said:



"I too could use these magical waters, for I know of many young men who are working hard to be prepared for life. Could I take some of these magical waters with me?"



The old Chief smiled and nodded.



"It is for the youth that these waters are most special."



"Take something special from one of the young men who are to be tested and dip it in the water. Pass the special item over the flame, and if the special item burns, but is not consumed, then they have done everything needed to be prepared."



(Turn out the lights.)



From one of the cub scouts before us, we take the Webelos Neckerchief.



(Clip the neckerchief to wire holders at corners. Be careful not to twist or fold the fabric. It must be smooth.)



And dip it in the Magic Water.



(Have the assistant dip the neckerchief while you hold the wire holders. Quickly take the neckerchief from the jar and spread it tightly between the wire holders. Your assistant covers the jar before you put the neckerchief over the candle, but you cannot wait too long. This part must be done quickly.)



Then pass it over the flame of the Spirit of Scouting.



(Do so.)



Scouts, you have passed the test and are prepared to cross over into Boy Scouting. May the Great Spirit of Akela go with you throughout your scouting days.



(At this point, it's not a bad idea to bring up the fire safety issue, and "Don't try this at home - only trained Cubmasters are allowed to perform this ceremony!" )



-- Thanks to George R. Davis





Webelos Graduation -- The Changing of the Shirt



This ceremony in which Webelos Scouts are graduated from the Pack to Boy Scout Troops, involves the whole Pack, including adult leaders. First, call forward the graduating Webelos Scouts and their parents. Next, form two lines (facing each other) as follows: nearest the graduates, pack committee members; then Cub Scout dens with leaders and den chiefs; then Webelos den and leaders. At the far end are Scoutmasters of the troops they boys will join.



As a variation to this ceremony, line everyone up as stated before except have the Webelos den begin a walk from the end opposite the Scoutmasters. As the boys proceed, they begin to remove their Webelos uniform shirt -- only to uncover their Boy Scout uniform shirt. Their Webelos uniform shirt has been taken care of by a designated adult during his (Webelos Scout) walk to be returned to later. At the end of the walk, applause and congratulations!



Crossing over to Scouting

 

Setting: A bridge is in the center stage. One side of the bridge is represented as the Cub Scout side and the other side as the Boy Scout side. You can use your imagination on how to symbolize each side so it is apparent which side is which. Use of Boy Scouts with candles lighting the path is very impressive. Cubmaster and Scoutmaster standing appropriate sides.



CUBMASTER: Tonight we mark a great occasion....the graduation of ______ Webelos Scouts into a boy scout troop. We are sad to see them leave because they have been a great help to our pack...but we are happy for them because they are going on to the great adventure of Boy Scouting. These Webelos have worked hard for this night and have advanced well. As a symbol of their hard work, each Webelos scout will be given an arrow. As I call your name, will each Scout come forward with your parents.



(Call each boys name off.)



Reader: The arrow alone gives meaning to each of these scouts. The wooden shaft gives the strength like the strength the Scout Promise gives each boy. The fletching helps guide the arrow on a straight and true path like the Scout Law guides the Scout on a straight and true path. The arrowhead points the way to the target like Webelos badge and Arrow of Light requirements have pointed the Scout to the ways of Boy Scouting.



Each arrow has these parts...but each arrow is different...it is individual. Each arrow represents their own trail through Cub Scouting. (Give each boy his arrow.)



It has been a long trail...As you look at the arrow you can look back and see how far you have traveled. Your first trail led you across the Bobcat Ridge, where Akela took you into the Pack as a Bobcat. The yellow mark tells that this boy completed his Bobcat requirements. You may have then climbed the steep Wolf Mountain. The red mark means he has completed the Wolf badge. After that there may be a gold and silver marks for the arrow points that you may have earned. After finding your way through Bear Forest, you may have earned your Bear rank. The green mark shows you have gained your Bear achievements, and again you may have earned a gold and silver arrow points. Your trail next may have led you to Webelos Rank. First earning three Webelos pins shown by three black marks, then your Webelos badge which is marked in blue. The Arrow of Light trail may have been hard and rugged. You first earned another four Webelos pins. Then came the highest Cub Scout Achievement, the Arrow of Light which is signified by the white marking on the arrow. The twelve beads will remind you of the twelve points of the Scout Law. The red and white feathers not only stand for the troops colors, but also for devotion and honor.



Your trail in Scouting does not end in Cub Scouting...it is only the beginning...for all of you have prepared yourself for the crossing over to Boy Scouts.



The bridge before you is a symbol of your crossing from Cub Scouting to Boy Scouting. The bridge is a structure carrying a pathway or roadway over a depression. It is a means of connection or transition from one side to another...as this bridge represents how our Pack is connected to our Troop . As I call each boys name, please come stand before Your Cubmaster where he will remove your Webelos neckerchief.



(Cubmaster is calling over to the Scoutmaster.)



CUBMASTER: Hello, Boy Scouts of Troop .



SCOUTMASTER: Hello, Cub Scouts of Akela. What do you desire?



CUBMASTER: We have several Webelos who have prepared themselves for entrance into your Troop.



SCOUTMASTER: Bring them and their parents forward to the bridge that joins our Pack and Troop. I will send two of my Scouts over to escort the boys and their parents over the bridge.



(Boy Scouts cross over to Pack's side and then escorts the new scout and their parents to the other side.)



Webelos leader speaking to the Scoutmaster: These are your new Scouts, ready for the adventures ahead of them. They are going to call themselves the ________ patrol.



Webelos leader speaking to the boys: As I call each of your names, please come forward to your Scoutmaster, where he will place on you the Neckerchief of Troop .



SCOUTMASTER: I'd like to welcome the new patrol and their families to our Troop . (Lights on)



SCOUTMASTER: Will Troop please form your patrols. (Have SPL lead all scouts in the Scout Promise)





Crossing the Bridge Ceremony Read by the Cubmaster



A BRIDGE is a structure carrying a pathway or roadway over a depression. It is a means of connection or transition from one side to another. During the years you and your son have been in Cub Scouting, we have had numerous opportunities to work together along the trail. Now, Boys' name is leaving the Pack to follow the trail of Boy Scouting. I am sure you are going to find the same satisfaction there that you have found in Cub Scouting.



As a symbol of the growth of your son and his entrance into Scouting, may I ask that he stand before me where I will divest him of his Webelos Handbook and neckerchief. (Take Webelos Handbook and Neckerchief from boy) You and he will slowly cross over the bridge into Scouting, pausing at each of the twelve steps. At the end of the twelve steps you will be welcomed by the Scouts of Troop # . (Dim the lights and have spot light shining on a bridge as the boy and parents cross the bridge.)



(As Cub takes each step, the Scouts call out loudly each of the Scout laws.)



1st - TRUSTWORTHY

2nd - LOYAL

3rd - HELPFUL

4th - FRIENDLY

5th - COURTEOUS

6th - KIND

7th - OBEDIENT

8th - CHEERFUL

9th - THRIFTY

10th - BRAVE

11th - CLEAN

12th - REVERENT



Read by Scouts -



We welcome you into Troop # , we meet each (Day) at (Time) at (Place) . We shall look forward to welcoming you at our next troop meeting.



Read by Scoutmaster -



(Hands Scout Handbook to new Scout) This book now replaces your Webelos book. Read and study it. Keep it handy for it is your guide through many adventures in Scouting.



Done by Assistant Scoutmaster - (Places Troop neckerchief around new Scouts neck and shakes his hand)

Crossover, The Final Steps



ARRANGEMENT: Darkened room, Red light is on bridge, which is centered between American and Pack flags. Assembled on stage to the left of the bridge are the parents and Webelos Leader, on the opposite end of the bridge is the Scoutmaster.



CUBMASTER: Tonight we mark a great occasion, ... the graduation of Webelos Scout (name) from our pack. We are sad to see him leave because he has been a great help to our Pa ck. but we are happy for him because he is going on to the great adventure of Scouting. He has worked hard for this night and has advanced well. Please escort Webelos Scout (name) to the front.



(Boy who has been standing on opposite side of room, is escorted to front by another Webelos Scout, who carries the den flag. They stop at front, the graduating Webelos Scout returns to his place.)



CUBMASTER: (Recaps information such as date boy joined pack, ranks he earned, awards he received, date joined Webelos den, etc.)



DEN LEADER: (Recaps activities in Webelos den, highlighting activity badges he has earned). Webelos Scout (name) it is with a great sense of pride that I now ask you for your Webelos neckerchief. (after removing neckerchief, Den Leader escorts him to end of bridge where Cubmaster is waiting.)



CUBMASTER: I am pleased to see that you are wearing the Arrow of Light, the highest award in Cub Scouting. This is the only Cub Scout badge which you will be permitted to wear on your Scout uniform. And now you may take the final steps. (Webelos Scout crosses bridge. He stops in center, turns to salute Cubmaster with Cub Scout salute. He proceeds across bridge to where the Scoutmaster is waiting. He gives him Scout salute).



SCOUTMASTER: (Name), we are happy to welcome you to our troop. I can see by the Arrow of Light that you are prepared to join the great fellowship of Scouting. (Short statement on what is expected of Scout). Please repeat after me the Scout Oath. (Scoutmaster and Scout exchange salute and shake hands). As a token of this important occasion, I would like to present you with the troop neckerchief. (Scoutmaster and parents meet in front of bridge.) Mr. and Mrs. (name), Welcome to our troop. I congratulate you on the fine work that you have done with your son in Cub Scouting. I am sure you will find new adventures in our troop.



The Scouting Ceremonies pages are presented by R. Gary Hendra -- The MacScouter -- UC Pack 92 & CC Troop 92, Milpitas, California





Darlene Jeske's favorite



My favorite ceremony was very symbolic. We grouped the Tigers, then Wolves, then Bears, then Webelos I, and finally the Webelos II Den Leaders in a line with the WII DLs standing closest to our bridge (decorated in blue & gold, of course). Den Leaders held lit blue & gold candles. On the other side of the bridge stood our Boy Scout Troop members, many of the Scouts held candles. The second year Webelos stood with their parents by the podium as the CM talked about the path those boys had taken, through Tigers, Wolves... He explained that this was their final time, as Cubs, that they would follow that path - the current Cubs representing the levels those boys had advanced through during their Cub experience. The Webelos II Den Leaders were holding Boy Scout handbooks - our Pack's final gift to them, and a present from their Akela to use on the next part of their journey. The boys were welcomed into Scouting by the Boy Scouts (with their leaders in the background since Scouting's boy led).



Everyone loved the ceremony - especially the Scouts who felt quite important holding the candles.





Jim Sleezer's Favorite



My favorite is to have the Webelos who bridge escorted from the meeting by their new scoutmasters, spls, etc. In one pack, the custom was to always do crossover ceremonies immediately after the opening. The Webelos entered the bridge with their blue loops which were removed midway and replaced with red. When the reached the other side of the bridge, they were greeted by representatives of their new troop who welcomed them and escorted them from the room to the troop meeting (same night at a nearby church). Those who didn't join that troop were also escorted from the room.



It eliminated an opportunity for congratulations over refreshments but we encouraged people to say good-byes before the opening ceremony. The only time our pack did not do crossover ceremonies was at Blue and Gold. At any other meeting of the year, a ceremony would be conducted if a Webelos was crossing over. The majority of the time, Webelos crossed over in March. Most received their AOL in February at B&G and crossed over the next month.







Webelos GRADUATION!





Goodbye from the Pack... Welcome to the Troop!



Every Webelos Scout should be recognized with a graduation ceremony before leaving the pack and entering a troop. This is not likely to happen, however, unless you have a plan of cooperation developed by your pack and the troop or troops that work with you. This plan should be the result of a joint meeting of the pack and the troop committees or of your Webelos den leader and the Scoutmaster.



The ceremony should include, in addition to the Webelos den leader or den chief, the graduate's prospective Scoutmaster, his patrol leader, and his parents. The

emphasis in this ceremony should not be merely to graduate the boy out of the pack, but to graduate the whole family into the troop.



We must not allow a boy to complete Webelos Scouting without helping him join a Boy Scout troop. This calls for a plan.



Do everything you can to see that your Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts want to become Boy Scouts. It's unlikely that a boy will be enthusiastic about having a troop experience if he knows nothing about it. So show these boys something of the adventure that lies ahead on the Scouting trail.



A most effective way of doing this is to include in your pack budget plan a subscription to Boys' Life magazine for every boy in the pack, and then to encourage parents to read it with their son. The magazine gives them

Scout-like stories and something of the flavor of Scouting. It can help make a boy want to become a Boy Scout.



These graduation ceremonies are merely suggestions. Use them as they are, revise them to suit the needs of your pack, or write your own.









Crossing the Bridge

Author: Unknown Scouter



PERSONNEL



Webelos den leader, Scoutmaster, a Boy Scout, graduating Webelos Scout and his parents.



EQUIPMENT

 

A rustic bridge; two spotlights, one directed on each end of the bridge; Boy Scout neckerchief.



ARRANGEMENT

Place the bridge on the stage or in front of the pack meeting room. The Webelos den leader, with the graduating Webelos Scout and his parents, stands on one end of the bridge. On the other end is the Scoutmaster with a Boy Scout holding a rolled troop neckerchief.



Webelos Den Leader: (To parents.) During the years you and your son have been in Cub Scouting, we have had numerous opportunities to work together along the trail. Now [Webelos Scout's name] is leaving the pack to enter Boy Scouting. I am sure you are going to find the same satisfactions there that you have found in Cub Scouting. To symbolize your son's growth and his entrance into Boy Scouting, I will divest him of his Webelos Scout neckerchief, and you and he will then cross over the bridge into Boy Scouting, to be welcomed by Scoutmaster [name] of Troop [number].

 

(After the Webelos den leader has removed the Webelos

Scout's neckerchief and saluted him, the Webelos Scout

and his parents cross the bridge and stand before the

Scoutmaster.)



Scoutmaster: (Greets Webelos Scout and parents with handshake.) As Scoutmaster of Troop [number], it is indeed a pleasure for me to welcome you into the troop. We meet each week at [time] at [place]. We shall look forward to welcoming you at our next meeting. (To boy.) And now I present to you this Boy Scout neckerchief (Places rolled neckerchief around the boy's neck.) May you wear it with pride; its colors are those of Troop [number], which welcomes you as its newest member.

 

(All exit.)

Seven Virtues of Life

Author: Unknown Scouter



PERSONNEL



Webelos den leader, Cubmaster, Scoutmaster, senior patrol leader, graduating Webelos Scout and parents.



EQUIPMENT



Seven torches or candles, Webelos emblem, and graduation certificates.



Cubmaster: Will Webelos Scout [name] and his parents come forward. Tonight we are assembled to honor a Webelos Scout and his parents who are members of the Webelos den. They have brought honor to our pack as they have climbed the Cub Scouting trail together. This Webelos Scout is now ready to go into the great brotherhood of Boy Scouting. With the help of his willing parents he will soon start up the Boy Scout trail.



The seven candles before you represent the rays in the Arrow of Light. As they are lighted you will hear how they stand for the seven great virtues of life. (Candles

are lighted by the Webelos den leader.)



Webelos Den Leader:

 

WISDOM. Having wisdom doesn't mean that a person is

smarter than others. It means that he uses what he knows

to live a better life.

 

COURAGE. Courage does not mean you have no fear of

danger. It means that you can face danger despite your

fear.

 

SELF-CONTROL. This means being able to stop when you

have had enough of something, such as eating, playing,

or even working too much.

 

JUSTICE. Justice means being fair with others we play

and work with, regardless of who they are.

 

FAITH. Faith is belief in God and things we cannot see

but feel are true.



HOPE. Hope means to look forward to good things you

believe will happen. You hope for better things

tomorrow, but at the same time you work hard today to

make them happen.

 

LOVE. There are many kinds of love. Love of family,

home, fellow men, God, and country. Every kind of love

is important for a full and happy life.



Cubmaster: You will find, if you live by these seven virtues, you will be happier. It is now my pleasure to present to you and your parents your graduation certificates. At this time I would like to introduce to you [name], Scoutmaster of Troop [number], who will accept you into the troop. I am sure he has a few words

of welcome for you and your parents.



Scoutmaster: (Welcomes Webelos Scout and his parents.) Senior Patrol Leader [name] will place our troop neckerchief on you. You will be inducted into our troop at our next meeting.



Senior Patrol Leader: As you remove your Cub Scout neckerchief, remember the things you learned in the Cub Scout program. And as you wear this Boy Scout neckerchief, remember that it represents the members of our troop who always try to do their best and be prepared. Welcome to our troop. (He salutes.)



(All exit.)



Four Winds

Author: Unknown Scouter



PERSONNEL



The Four Winds (four Cub Scouts), each with a candle; graduating Webelos Scouts and their parents; light switch operator; Scoutmaster; Cubmaster; Webelos den leader.



EQUIPMENT



Four candles, Boy Scout neckerchiefs, graduation certificates, gifts (optional).



ARRANGEMENT



Graduating Webelos Scouts and their parents are at the front of the room, which is in semi-darkness. Cub Scouts representing the Four Winds stand in each corner of the room. Each lights his candle as he expresses his wish for the graduating Webelos Scouts. After expressing his wish, he comes to the front of the room.



North Wind: I am the North Wind. People say I am cold, but to you I will always bring the warmest of winds because you have been true-blue Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts and have lived up to the Law of the Pack.



South Wind: I am the South Wind. I wish you good Scouting. Over hill and dale I have carried stories of you and your experiences. As Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts you have been happy, game, and fair - a credit to your den and pack.



East Wind: I am the East Wind. I wish you well. I have spread the story of our fun and happiness in Cub Scouting with Pack [number] and of how you lived up to the Cub Scout Promise and were fair and helpful.



West Wind: I am the West Wind. I would like everyone present to know that these graduating Webelos Scouts did not walk the Cub Scout trail alone. Each had the wonderful help and guidance of his parents. Parents, continue to help your boys go and grow!



All Winds: (in unison.) We will be with you forever. We wish you the best of luck in your travels and experiences on the Scouting trail.



(The room lights come on. The graduating Webelos Scouts and their families are introduced to their new Scoutmaster. The parents replace the Webelos Scout neckerchief with a new Boy Scout neckerchief. The Cubmaster presents graduation certificates. The Webelos den leader may present a gift and give a short speech followed by a thundering cheer from the den as all return to their seats.)



(All exit.)



Cub Scout Family Graduation

Author: Unknown Scouter



This ceremony can be held indoors or outdoors, in uniform or in Indian costume.



PERSONNEL



Webelos den leader, graduating Webelos Scout and his parents, Scoutmaster, patrol leader, five Cub Scouts to hold posters, den leaders, pack committee members.



EQUIPMENT



Small posters of all Cub Scout ranks, Boy Scout neckerchief and neckerchief slide.



ARRANGEMENT



All Cub Scouts, Webelos Scouts, den leaders, and committee members line up in two columns. Small poster bearing the five Cub Scout ranks are held by Cub Scouts. The Webelos den leader, graduating Webelos Scout, and his parents stand at one end of the double column. The Scoutmaster and patrol leader of the graduate's new troop face them at the other end of the column.



When all are in their places, the Webelos den leader reads a review of the graduate's accomplishments during his Cub Scout years, mentioning awards he has received.



Webelos Den Leader: Our accomplishments are never made without help. And significant in [graduate's name's] growth has been the help he has received from his parents. I thank you for the help you have given your son and your cooperation with his den and pack leaders. Of course, we shall miss you as you move on into Boy Scouting - but, we are honored to present Troop [number] such an outstanding family! All of us here wish you continued success as you climb the Scouting trail.



(The graduate and his parents now pass down the line between the two columns, receiving good wishes and good-byes from all pack members. Cub Scouts might sing "For They're a Jolly Good Family," to the tune of "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" as the graduate and his parents pass down the line. When the graduating Webelos Scout and his parents reach the end of the column, the Scoutmaster welcomes them.)



Scoutmaster: You have had a great experience in Cub Scouting and Webelos Scouting. Boy Scouting will introduce you to new skills that lead to more great fun - hiking and camping. Mr. and Mrs. [name], we hope you will continue to help your son, and we will look forward to your active participation in making our troop one of the best. In so doing you will be assured that your son is receiving full benefits from his Scouting experience.



(The graduate's patrol leader now replaces the Webelos Scout neckerchief with the neckerchief of his new troop and gives him the Scout handshake. Close with a graduation song, grand howl, or other appropriate closing.)



(All exit.)



Bridge to Boy Scouting

Author: Unknown Scouter



This impressive ceremony for Webelos Scouts can be used indoors or outdoors. Advancement recognition ceremonies for the lower ranks may precede it.



PERSONNEL



Webelos den leader (Akela), Scoutmaster, den chief as torchbearer, Boy Scouts from troop, graduating Webelos Scout and his parents, senior patrol leader.



EQUIPMENT



A rustic bridge with railings made of dead tree branches and floored with scrap lumber; two campfires (artificial ones for indoors); camp candle lantern to be carried by the torchbearer; Boy Scout neckerchief.



ARRANGEMENT



A campfire is at each end of the bridge. The Webelos Scout and his parents are seated around one campfire; the Boy Scouts around the other.



If this ceremony is held indoors, the room should be darkened.



Webelos Den Leader: (Webelos den leader asks Webelos Scout to stand and repeat Cub Scout Promise. Then he calls: Hello, Scouts of [name of troop].



Scoutmaster: (answers.) Hello, Webelos Scouts of Akela, what do you desire?



Webelos Den Leader: We have a Webelos Scout of Akela's council ring who has prepared himself for entrance into the council ring of [name of troop].



Scoutmaster: Bring him forward to the bridge that joins our two council rings.



(The Webelos den leader, accompanied by the torchbearer, leads graduating Webelos Scout and his parents to bridge. Scoutmaster crosses over bridge and is introduced to the parents and the Webelos Scout.)



Webelos Den Leader: [Name of graduate], you have contributed much to your den and pack, and we shall miss you and your parents. Now you are leaving us to enter the Boy Scout troop of your choice. There you will continue to grow in Scouting skills and friendships.



An important part of your Webelos Scout uniform is your neckerchief. Now that you are leaving our pack and Cub Scouting, will you remove your neckerchief and give it to me? Your new Scoutmaster will place about your neck the neckerchief of the troop you are to join.

 

(The Webelos Scout removes his neckerchief and gives it

to the Webelos den leader. The Scoutmaster now beckons

the graduate to follow him across the bridge.)



Scoutmaster: (standing before the Boy Scout campfire.) As Scoutmaster of Troop [number], I welcome you and your parents. There are many traditions in Troop [number] that will interest you.



(The Scoutmaster may explain one or two traditions and

tell of important troop activities planned for the near

future.)



Now it is my pleasure to present to you the neckerchief of our troop.



(He places the neckerchief around the neck of the incoming Boy Scout.) Wear it with pride as many have done before you. Your senior patrol leader, [name], now

wishes to express the troop's happiness in having you as a new member.

 

(The senior patrol leader leads the troop in a cheer for

the new Scout. This is followed by the troop song or a

good Scout song such as "Trail the Eagle;' found in the

Boy Scout Songbook, and the Scout Oath.)



(All exit.)





Graduation from Pack

to Troop

Author: Unknown Scouter



The whole ceremony, as presented here, has been made informal, with the idea that those taking part will use their own words. This merely suggests what packs can work up for themselves.



PERSONNEL



Cubmaster, denner, den chief, Scoutmaster, patrol leader, Webelos Scout and his parents.



EQUIPMENT



Electric campfire, graduation certificate.



ARRANGEMENT



The lights are dimmed. The artificial fire is lit at one end of the room. The Cub Scouts are called together in a formation that will make the ceremony easy to conduct(square or half circle).



The denner brings forward the graduating Webelos Scout(s).



Cubmaster: Friends and parents, Webelos Scout [name] is ready to graduate into the Boy Scout troop. [Name], you have looked forward to this for 4 years. You have been a good Cub Scout, and a good Webelos Scout, and we know you will be a good Boy Scout. We are all proud of you.



Denner: [Name], the members of Den [number] are happy to see you graduate into the Boy Scout troop. We don't feel bad about your going because soon we will all be Boy Scouts, maybe even in the same patrol. (The denner leads the den in a yell for the departing Webelos Scout.)



Den Chief: There are two things, [name]. First, I want to tell you that I have enjoyed my association with you in Den [number], and second, Fm glad to welcome you to Troop [number], where we will be able to keep on doing things together.



Cubmaster: (Presents graduation certificate to the graduate.) Scoutmaster, we now present to you and Troop [number] Webelos Scout [name], who is eager to be a Boy Scout. We recommend him highly. He has been a fine member of our pack.



Scoutmaster: [Name], on behalf of Troop [number], I want to welcome you into the great Scouting brotherhood. The boys tell me that you have been asked to join the [name] Patrol, so I would like to have you meet [name], who will be your patrol leader.



Patrol Leader: There are already two Boy Scouts in our patrol who were in your den. They are fine Boy Scouts and we are glad to welcome another graduate of Den

[number]. We hope there will soon be more of you. We are having a meeting of our patrol [day, time, and place], and we would like to have you attend.



Cubmaster: (Asks the parents of the graduating Webelos Scout to come forward.) Friends, we of the pack wish to congratulate you upon the graduation of your son. You have done much to keep him interested and happy in Cub Scouting, and we appreciate it. I would like to have you meet the Scoutmaster. (Introduces the Scoutmaster to the parents. The pack forms a circle around the Cubmaster, Scoutmaster, and graduate.)



In Boy Scouting, you will have the Scout Oath and Law to guide you, but as you leave us to follow the trail through Scouting, we would like you to renew with us the Cub Scout Promise. (The whole group repeats the promise. The circle then breaks to let the Scoutmaster and graduate out, and re-closes around the Cubmaster. The group faces the graduate and gives the Cub Scout salute.



The entire group shouts: "Do Your Best!")



Archway to Boy Scouting

Author: Unknown Scouter



This is a graduation ceremony with a musical touch.



PERSONNEL



Cubmaster, assistant Cubmaster, Webelos den leader, denner, den chief, parents of graduates, Scoutmaster, patrol leader, graduating Webelos Scouts.



EQUIPMENT



Rustic archway, as shown; artificial campfire; United States flag, pack flag, troop flag; graduation certificates; Boy Scout neckerchiefs.



ARRANGEMENT



Set up the rustic archway at the center of the stage with Boy Scout and Webelos Scout emblems suspended from its top. On each upright hang acoustical tile squares bearing drawings or decals of the Bobcat, Wolf, Bear, Webelos, and Arrow of Light emblems. The artificial campfire and the pack flag are to the left of the arch. The United States and troop flags are to the right. Graduating Webelos Scouts and their parents are on stage.



Cubmaster: Tonight we honor graduating Webelos Scouts [names]. Will the graduates' den leader and den chief come forward and stand behind the graduates.



Scoutmaster [name] and Patrol Leader [name], of the [name] Patrol, please stand to the right of the arch. In honor of these graduates, let's all sing "We're on the Upward Trail," found in the Cub Scout Songbook.

 

(After the song, the Cubmaster continues.)Webelos Scouts [names], you are graduating from Cub Scouting. With your parents, you have visited and decided to join Troop [number]. You have been active members of our pack for [number] years and we are proud to recommend you and your parents to Scoutmaster [name]. Come join our group and stand by our campfire and flag.



Webelos Den Leader: [Graduates' names], the members of our Webelos den regret losing you. You have earned each of the Cub Scout ranks displayed on the archway and are ready to become Boy Scouts. I have enjoyed my association with you and your parents. May you continue to do your best.



Cubmaster: To help you remember this warm and friendly campfire, our assistant Cubmaster will lead us in singing "Cub Scout Advancement Song" (After the song, the Cubmaster continues.) As you leave the warmth of our fire please accept this certificate of graduation. (presents certificates.) Remove your Webelos Scout neckerchief. I now escort you and your parents through the archway to meet Scoutmaster [name].



Scoutmaster: (Gives Scout handclasp to the graduates and their parents.) On behalf of Troop [number], I welcome you to the Scouting brotherhood. Our troop has great traditions and high standards. We hope you will help keep them high. Since you wish to join the [name] Patrol, I have [name], the patrol leader, with me.



Patrol Leader: We welcome you into the [name] Patrol. Our troop, furnishes den chiefs for Pack [number]. Our patrol tries to be the best in our troop. We will count on you to help us. (He gives graduates the Scout handclasp.)



Scoutmaster: (To the parents.) As you and your boy enter Boy Scouting, you and he should realize that he is entering a new world of activity. However, he will continue to need your help and encouragement. There are many ways you can help. I will look forward to your participation in our activities.



(To graduates.) We have already had a visit together. As soon as we have another conference on your Boy Scout requirements, you will be invested at a troop meeting. You may now wear this Boy Scout neckerchief to show you belong to our troop. (Places neckerchief around neck of each pack graduate.)



Congratulations!

 

The Milepost

Author: Unknown Scouter



PERSONNEL



Cubmaster, Webelos den chief, graduating Webelos Scout and his parents, Scoutmaster, and two Scout aides.



EQUIPMENT



Troop neckerchief for graduate.



Cubmaster: (Addressing audience.) Cub Scouting is part of the great Scouting movement.

In the final months of his Webelos Scouting experience, a boy learns the requirements for the Boy Scout badge. He decides what troop he will join and, with his parents, arranges for his entrance into Boy Scouting. Tonight our pack has the privilege of bringing another Webelos Scout to this significant milepost.



(Addressing den chief.) Den Chief [name], will you escort Webelos Scout [name] and his parents forward.(The Cubmaster greets them.) [Webelos Scout's name] has chosen Troop [number] as his preference. The Scoutmaster of Troop [number], Mr. [name], is here. We will ask his to come forward with his aides. (The Cubmaster introduces the Scoutmaster and his aides to the Webelos Scout, his parents, and the audience.)



[Webelos Scout's name], I remember the night you became a Cub Scout. You and your parents stood in this same spot. That night a whole new world of opportunity was opened to you through Cub Scouting. During the past years you have experienced that good feeling that comes in giving goodwill to others. Now you have the privilege of becoming a Boy Scout. This ceremony marks the completion of your Cub Scouting, just as it marks the beginning of a whole new experience in Boy Scouting.



[Addressing Scoutmaster] Scoutmaster [name], Pack [number] is proud to present Webelos Scout [name], holder of the Arrow of Light Award. It is our hope and belief that you and your Scouts will provide him the finest opportunity to carry on his Scouting.



Scoutmaster: [Webelos Scout's name], it is a real privilege to welcome you into Troop [number]. As a Boy Scout you will hike and camp. You will learn many useful things. You will have an opportunity to continue to grow into a useful citizen because you will participate in civic activities and learn the thrill of helping other people by practicing the habit of doing a Good Turn every day. And now Scouts [name] and [name] will exchange your Webelos Scout neckerchief for our troop neckerchief, a symbol of graduation into Boy Scouting.



(Aides replace the Webelos Scout neckerchief with a Boy Scout neckerchief, give the Scout handclasp, step back, and salute. The graduating Webelos Scout should have been coached to return this salute. The Webelos den chief leads the pack in a yell for the graduate. The Cubmaster dismisses the graduate with a warn handshake, and aides escort the graduate, the Scoutmaster, and the family off the stage.)



Webelos Graduation

Author: Unknown Scouter



PERSONNEL



Cubmaster, Webelos Scout and his parents, Webelos den leader, Scoutmaster, denner, light switch operator.



EQUIPMENT



US. flag, pack flag, Webelos den flag; bridge; troop neckerchief;. red spotlight.



ARRANGEMENT



In a dimly lit room the red spotlight is on the bridge, which is centered between the U.S. and pack flags. Assembled on stage, to the left of the bridge, are the parents and Webelos den leader; on the opposite end of the bridge is the Scoutmaster.



Cubmaster: Tonight we mark a great occasion, the graduation of Webelos Scout [name] from our pack. We are sad to see him leave because he has been a great help to our pack, but we are happy for him because he is going on to the great adventure of Boy Scouting. He has worked hard for this night and has advanced well. Please escort Webelos Scout [name] to the front.



(The graduate, who has been standing on the opposite side of the room, is escorted to the front by the denner from the Webelos den, who carries the Webelos den flag. They stop at the front, The graduating Webelos Scout salutes and joins his den leader on stage. The denner returns to his place.)



Cubmaster: (Recaps information such as date boy joined pack, ranks he has earned, awards he received, date he joined Webelos den, etc.)



Webelos Leader: (Recaps activities in Webelos den, activity badges he has earned.) Webelos Scout [name], it is with great pride that I now ask you for your Webelos neckerchief (After the graduate removes his neckerchief, the leader escorts him to the end of the bridge, where the Cubmaster is waiting.)



Cubmaster: I am pleased to see that you are wearing the Arrow of Light (if he is), the highest award in Cub Scouting. This is the only Cub Scout badge of rank that you will be permitted to wear on your Boy Scout uniform. And now, you may take the final steps. (The Webelos Scout crosses the bridge. He stops in the center, turns and salutes the Cubmaster with the Boy Scout salute. He proceeds across the bridge and gives the Scoutmaster the Boy Scout salute.)



Scoutmaster: [Name], we are happy to welcome you to our troop. I can see by the Arrow of Light that you are prepared to join the great fellowship of Boy Scouting. (If the boy does not have the Arrow of Light, makes any appropriate welcoming speech, then a short statement on what is expected of a Boy Scout.) Please repeat with me the Scout Oath. (The Scoutmaster and Scout exchange salutes and a Scout handclasp.) As a token of this important occasion, I would like to present to you. the troop neckerchief



(The Scoutmaster and parents meet in front of the bridge.)



[Name], welcome to our troop. I congratulate you on the fine work that you have done with your son in Cub Scouting. You will find new adventures with your son in our troop.



(The red light is turned off. The house lights go on. The participants leave stage.)



Closing Graduation

Author: Unknown Scouter



When using this closing, care must be taken that the Webelos Scouts are helped to make the transition into Boy Scouting.



PERSONNEL



Cubmaster; graduating Webelos Scouts and their parents; color guard; all boys in the pack.



EQUIPMENT



Colors; graduation certificates.



Cubmaster: Our closing this evening will be, very special. Webelos Scouts, please stand at attention in front of your chairs. Tonight we mark a great occasion, the graduation of Webelos Scouts from our pack. We are sad to see them leave because they have been a great credit to our pack, but we are happy for them because they are going on to the great adventure of Boy Scouting. They have worked hard for this night and have advanced well. We hope you won't forget us; for as leaders, we will not forget any of you great Webelos Scouts. As you continue in Boy Scouting, we ask you not to forget the fun you have had and the many things you have learned as Cub Scouts. We also invite you to return to Pack [number] in the near future as den chiefs.



The color guard will please form in the center of the room. All Cub Scouts and parents, relatives and guests, please join the color guard.



As your name is called, you and your parents will please walk through the Cub Scout ranks and through the color guard to receive your graduation certificates.



(With ceremony, presents each boy and his parents with his graduation certificate.)



Cubmaster: Graduating Webelos Scouts, please pass by your friends as you leave tonight and tell them good-bye.





From Akela to Scoutmaster

Author: Unknown Scouter



PERSONNEL



Akela (Cubmaster), Webelos den leader, Scoutmaster, Webelos den chief, denner, patrol leader, graduating Webelos Scout and his parents, tom-tom beater, light switch operator, curtain opener.



EQUIPMENT



Artificial campfire, tom-tom, Indian costume for Akela, curtain.



ARRANGEMENT



The lights dim, the curtain opens, and we see Akela standing behind an artificial campfire in the center of the stage. Akela raises his hand in a gesture of friendship. There is the steady, slow beat of a tom-tom in the background. The graduating Webelos Scout, escorted by his denner and Webelos den chief, enters from the back of the room.



They are followed by the patrol leader, who singles out the parents of the graduating Webelos Scout from the audience and escorts them to the stage. As all reach the stage, Akela lowers his arm, the tom-tom beat rises in crescendo, then falls silent.



Akela: Tonight we are assembled to honor a Webelos Scout and his parents. They have brought honor to our pack as they have climbed the Cub Scout trail together. This Webelos Scout is now ready to go into the great brotherhood of Boy Scouting. With help from his parents he will soon start up the Boy Scouting trail. Is there anyone who will speak for this Webelos Scout and his parents?



Webelos Den Leader: Mighty Akela, [Webelos Scout's name] has been a faithful and loyal member of the Webelos den. He and his parents have contributed greatly to our program. [Denner's name], our denner, will speak on behalf of the Webelos den.



Denner: [Webelos Scout's name], the boys of the Webelos den will miss you. But now that you are completing your Cub Scouting, we are happy to see you graduating into the Boy Scout troop. Before long, we too will all be Boy Scouts, maybe even in the same patrol.



Akela: Thank you [denner's name]. Now will Scoutmaster [name] please come forward.



(The Scoutmaster comes to the stage from the audience and gives Akela the Scout salute. Akela returns the Cub Scout salute.) [Scoutmaster's name], as Cubmaster of this pack, I am happy to present Webelos Scout [name] and his parents. You have already met him, but now he is ready to become a member of your troop.



Scoutmaster: [Webelos scout's name], I welcome you and your parents into the brotherhood of Scouting. You have expressed a desire to join the [name] Patrol. May I present to you the patrol leader of that patrol.



Patrol Leader: (Gives Scout handclasp.) There are already some Boy Scouts in our troop who were Webelos Scouts in your den. They are now fine Boy Scouts. We are glad to welcome another graduate. We meet every [day] evening at [place] at [time]. We look forward to having you with us.



Scoutmaster: (To parents.) [Name], we of Troop [number] wish to congratulate you on the graduation of your son. You have done much to keep him interested and happy in Cub Scouting. I am certain that [Cubmaster's name] and [Webelos den leader's name] appreciate your cooperation. At this time, [parent's name], I would like to extend the handclasp of Boy Scouting to you with the hope that you will continue on the Scouting trail with your son. We have a place for you as a leader or member of our troop committee. I believe that both you and [son's name] will appreciate and enjoy the exciting program our troop has planned for months ahead in Troop [number].



Akela: Now our ceremony will come to a close as [Webelos Scout's name] joins the members of his den in the living circle for the last time.



Webelos Outdoor AOL and Bridging

Author: Jack Clow

 

PERSONNEL



Akela (Cubmaster), Webelos Den Leader, Scoutmaster and Boy Scouts, graduating Webelos Scouts and their parents, tom-tom beaters.



EQUIPMENT



Scout assembled field bridge, tom-toms, candles for each boy, AOL candleholder, campfire, wooden target arrows.



ARRANGEMENT

We do our bridging at our spring campout. With the Boy Scouts supervising the construction of a bridge from lodge poles and rope. Cub Scout flags at one end and Boy Scout flags, Boy Scouts, and Scoutmaster (and other troop leaders) at the other end. First we cross boys who do not attain the AOL, one at a time.



Webelos Den Leader: Would [Cub Scout name] Scout please approach and cross the bridge (On the Boy Scout side the Boy scouts will present the boys with their new Boy Scout neckerchiefs. Then send the boys back one by one to bring their parents across.)



(then we call the names of the Webelos who are to receive the AOL.)



Webelos Den Leader: Would the following Cub Scouts [say Cub Scout names] who have achieved the Arrow Of Light please approach and cross the bridge. (As they start to cross) Stop! You have further accomplishments. (drum beat)There will be silence, please! (pause) The drum of the great leader Akela calls all to recognize those Cub Scouts who have achieved the greatest of all cub scout honors. These scouts have honored Akela and their parents and families. The road to the Arrow of Light is not an easy one and this accomplishment is not to be taken lightly. These scouts have shown their courage to continue and see a task through to the end. In this end there is a new beginning. The beginning of new leadership for tomorrow. We gather here tonight to honor these scouts and we are humbled by their accomplishment. They show us that by following the proper trail and facing the challenges it presents us, we can all reach our destination.

 

(pause)



Webelos Den Leader: Would the parents of the [scouts' names] join them before the council of Akela.



(pause)



Webelos Den Leader: Akela, tell us of the trail these scouts followed to achieve the Arrow Of Light."



(pause)



Akela: (recites AOL requirements and explains significance of their accomplishment, then presents each boy with a candle.) Webelos Scouts, please light your candles.



(the scouts light candles and place them on Arrow of light sign we have placed between the Cub Scout flags.)



Akela: Scouts please face the campfire. Bearer of the arrow, present arrows. (WDL comes forward with arrows, one for each boy, we use wooden target arrows with a small piece of flash paper from local magic shop, wrapped around tip)

 

(Stopping at each compass point around the fire holding

arrows forward toward the point then toward the

spectators, then the receiving boys. present an arrow to

each boy.)



Webelos Den Leader: These arrows symbolize the straight path one must follow. The light symbolizes the enlightenment of knowledge and for doing right for others. (tell all boys to hold arrow next to the feathers and one at a time place the tip of the arrow into the flame of their candle.) Akela will now present the Arrow Of Light to the Scouts. (and pins to mothers) Would the Scouts follow Akela for their secret ceremony. (out of sight of the others we explain to the significance of the AOL award, and that it is the only Cub Scout award that can be proudly worn on a boy scout uniform. The scouts return to the camp fire.)



Akela: Scouts please escort your parents to the bridge but cross the bridge alone. Parents will wait on this side.

 

(On the Boy Scout side the Boy scouts will present the

boys with their new Boy Scout neckerchiefs. Then send

the boys back one by one to bring their parents across.

All new Boy Scouts assemble before the crowd.)



Scoutmaster: I would like to personally welcome all of these fine BOY SCOUTS and their families to Troop [number]. Would all of you please join me in welcoming them?

 

(loud Scout cheer!)



Bridging Ceremony:



Setting: Special Pack meeting with all cubs & families in attendance



Ceremony led by: Cubmaster & Assistants, Receiving Troop Scoutmaster, Senior Patrol Leader, & Boy Scouts



Props: Tom-tom playing in background Candles for Arrow of Light Accent lighting for Cub Scout & Boy Scout areas

Bridge device for boys to cross from Pack leaders to Troop Leaders



CUBMASTER: Please join me to congratulate, ________boy's name?____. He has proven to all that he desires pure thought and strong spirit. I am proud of you. You, who have completed all requirements of Cub Scouting, can now see beyond the summit of Cub Scouting. You now see the start of a new trail. This trail will be a pathway that leads to the realm of our brothers in the sky, the Eagles.



As you begin this journey, we must remove the symbols of Cub Scouting.



As you begin this journey, You must remember the meaning of the seven rays on you Arrow of Light award.



The candles that were lit to show your spirit will now be extinguished as you cross the bridge to start your new journey in Boy Scouting. You must work to rekindle the flame, to shine the light, to gain the strength of our brothers in the sky, the Eagles.



The scout is held with the CM as assistant CM extinguishes each of the 7 candles, reciting:



Remember the Light of Wisdom: Wisdom does not just mean superior knowledge. Wisdom means putting your knowledge to the right use.



Remember the Light of Courage: Courage is not the quality that enables men to meet danger without fear, it is the ability to meet danger in spite of our fears.



Remember the Light of Self-Control: You have learned to limit yourself in many ways: eating, talking, and working.



Remember the Light of Justice: Justice is the practice of dealing fairly with others without prejudice, or disregard for a person due to

race, color or creed.



Remember the Light of Faith: Your faith is your conviction against those who tell you it's not true. As one insightful lad said: faith is when you turn on the light switch believing the light will come on.



Remember the Light of Hope: Hope means to expect good things with confidence. Always hope for better things to come. A man without hope is of little good to his neighbors or himself.



Remember the Light of Love: Love of family, love of home, love of fellowman, love of God, love of country. Each love will be important for you to achieve a full life.



So, remember these seven rays of light. For now the place is dark, and you are being led across the bridge to Boy Scouting. You have reached the pinnacle of the summit of success in Cub Scouting, and we pray that you will reach the pinnacle of the summit of success in Boy Scouting, to join the brothers who are Eagles.



<Boy is ushered to cross bridge. Boy is received by Troop Scoutmaster>>



_________<boy's name>__________, As Scoutmaster for Troop ______, I am pleased to receive you as you cross the bridge to Boy Scouting. Your achievements in Cub Scouting are well-known to us.



To tie the token of Membership, I introduce ___________, our Troop Senior Patrol Leader, to award our Troop neckerchief



To guide your path in Boy Scouting, I introduce __________, our Troop Guide, to award your new Handbook for Boy Scouting.



To give fellowship in our Troop, I introduce __________, __________, our Scouts who represent each level of Boy Scouting who will share their experiences, and lead you to new skills and challenges.



On behalf of Troop ________, we welcome you to Boy Scouting. May your trail not be broken until you too, reach the realm of the Eagle. As your scoutmaster, I will challenge you to soar to great heights and continue to reach the highest award that a Boy Scout can achieve.



BENEDICTION: <after all boys received>



Senior Patrol Leader:



Let us bow our heads together.



We now call upon the Great Spirit, Akela, for his blessing on all of these young men and everyone who has gathered in council tonight. May these young Scouts always strive to obtain the noblest and highest ideals in their lives. Let strength be their guide. Cause them to follow a straight trail and to never be a reason for others to waiver from the true path. Protect us for many moons to come. May the Great Master of all Scouts be with us until we meet again.



Graduation Ceremony



This ceremony may be done alone or in conjunction with the arrow of light ceremony.

 

Unmarked lines are in both versions. Lines preceded by * are in the stand alone version. Lines preceded by $ are in the version with the arrow of light. When used in conjunction with the arrow of light, omit the last line from the arrow of light ceremony.



*(Nutiket enters with drum followed by Meteu.)



*Meteu: Brother Nutiket, why have we been called here tonight?



*Nutiket: Because some of these Webelos have advanced in their pack.



*Meteu: Then we shall call forth Allowat Sakima the mighty chief.



*(Nutiket beats drum three times. Allowat enters to beating drum.)



*Allowat: Brother Meteu, why have you called me out here tonight.



*Meteu: Because some of these Webelos have finished their cub scouting life and are now *progressing to Boy Scouts.



Allowat: Brother Meteu, have we finished the business for which we have gathered.



Meteu: No, some of these Webelos have finished their cub scouting life and are now progressing to Boy Scouts.



Nutiket: Will all the parents and those Webelos not entering Boy Scouts please take their seats.



Allowat: Have they been told the story of (insert story name).



Meteu: No they have not.



Allowat: Then I as chief shall tell it to them. (insert story)



Meteu: Would the Cubmaster who presents these Webelos please stand at the right side of the bridge. (if no bridge is present, from a bridge with two lines of scouts) Would the Scoutmaster who receives these new Boy Scouts please stand at the left side of the bridge.



Nutiket: Please raise your right hand to the scout sign and repeat, after Allowat Sakima, the Scout Oath and Law.



(Allowat says the Scout Oath and Law, pausing for the Webelos to repeat after him)



Allowat: You will now follow Nutiket as he leads you across the bridge into Boy Scouting.



(Nutiket leads Webelos across)



Nutiket: We now conclude our ceremony and leave you to meet you new Scoutmaster.



(All exit to drum beat.)





Cub Scout Graduation and Crossover Ceremonies



These Cub Scout Ceremonies are from the Scouts-L mailing list. There are many fine ideas here to help make your pack's ceremony special for yourCubs.







Graduation Campfires



One of our discussion prior was on 'When boys move to next level'. I'm putting together the final preparations of our graduation ceremony now, so I thought I'd share it with you.



First of all, other than the Webelos Crossing Over Ceremony, which is held in March, we keep boys in their respective dens/tiger cub groups until June 1 (irregardless of what Council/national does with our membership roster). We started this tradition last year and have found the boys are in exciting anticipation for this years event. We have TWO graduation campfires. One which addresses, graduation from Tigers/Wolfs to the next level, and the other for Bears/Webelos-1 to their next level!



We've reserved one of our local Day Camps for the setting. It's a VERY NICE camp, with a gathering area, and a long trail with a long suspension bridge over a creak that leads to a meadow 'Campfire' area. Our campfire is as follows:



1. Gathering of all boys in the upper area -- I'll lead two songs to get them in the spirit, "If you're Happy and you know it - clap your hands" and "Swiss Boy" (This is a favorite and we only do it at his campfire.)



2. After the songs, I give a brief instruction that we're about to be called into the campfire area. We will proceed in line, boys first, parents follow. They should maintain quiet and observe the surrounding nature as we approach the campfire bowl.



3. I signal my Assistant CM, who blows an Elk Horn. This is in return, answered by another Elk horn, blown from the Meadow. And in the distance we hear the tom-tom begin beating.



4. I lead the boys down the path, across the bridge, down the trail into the campfire bowl, where we wait until everyone has arrived.



5. I stand with the fire between me and the boys and declare that because last years campfire was so special and meaningful, I've saved the ashes to spread on this years fire. I entice the boys to help me light the fire with their Scout Spirit as I spread the ashes on the fire. [Actually the ashes are 'Granular Chlorine, being spread into a container of Pine-Sol. The result being lots of white smoke and a flame flair, which will start the fire. It is very impressive if done correctly and with spirit.]



6. After the fire has started we do an action song. Something along the line of Zulu Chief, or "Robert Baden Powell-Had Many Scouts".



7. Cheer -- From our 'Cheer Box'



8. Skit -- This year's skit will be presented by a group of Boy Scouts whom have graduated from our Pack.



9. Action Song -- Malo.



10. Cheer -- From our 'Cheer Box'



11. Story -- The story this year is about 'Scout Spirit' I use a large gallon jar, filled 3/4 with fine dirt, and a ping pong ball. When I turn it upside down the ping pong ball is on the bottom. The ping pong ball is a Scout. As I talk about the virtues of Scouting I slightly Shake the jar. Within a few shakes (about one minute of talking) the ping pong ball appears at the top of jar having overcome the great weight of the dirt. The moral of the story focuses on that the virtues of Scouting overcomes all that is dumped on you.



12. Award ceremony -- This is the first year we've included major award presentations (i.e. Wolf, Bear, Webelos, etc.) and that is because we lost the school for our last pack meeting.



13. Graduation Ceremony. Each group is called up around the fire - They are congratulated for being a part of Scouting and for continuing along Akela's trail. The Tiger Ceremony is really beefed up to include presentation of certificate, pin, patch and segment, then the presentation of their Wolf Scarf and book. The Wolf, Bear ceremony includes removal of the old scarf and presentation of the new, along with the book. Webelos-1 to Webelos-2 includes the presentation of a new Slide. It's one of those Safety Pin Indian Bonnet's made by one of our mothers (very nice).



14. After the Graduation Ceremony, we sing 'Mm Mm I want to linger"



15. I call all boys to circle the campfire in a friendship circle, with parents standing behind the boys. Standing in the middle I offer up the following closing remarks:



Wood smoke at eventide smoothes the soul and makes an easy ladder for a prayer. May the smoke of this fire carry your thoughts Heavenward and make your hearts strong for good scouting.



16. We than close the campfire with singing 'Cub Scout Vespers'. After the first verse, we break the friendship circle and my Assistant CM leads the boys back up the trail, over the bridge to the upper camp area. As they are leaving the campfire area we hum the 'Cup Scout vespers tune.



This graduation leaves a very momentous reminder in the minds of the boys! Many of the boys who've graduated recall the graduation campfire as one of those times they liked about Cub Scouting.



Hope your campfires are as memorable.



Our Campfire



* Gathering Activity - Swiss Boy Song / If You're happy Song / Robert Baden-Powell Song

* Procession to Campfire - Blowing the Horn / Drum Beating

* Opening - and fire lighting

* Greetings - introduction

* YELL -- Boom Chica Boom

* SONG - Grand Ol' Duke of York

* Cheer

* SKITS (a rapid assortment of run-on's and skits....moving very quickly)

* Cheer

* SONG - Alice The Camel

* Cheer

* Ping Pong Ball Story

* Advancement Ceremony - Four Arrow Ceremony

* Graduation (all boys circle around the campfire in a friendship circle, with parents behind them)

* Song - "Mm, Mm I want to Linger"

* Cubmaster minute

* SONG - 'Boy Scout Vespers' in living Circle(Bears/Webelos)

* SONG - 'Cub Scout Vespers' in living Circle (Tigers/Wolfs)

* Procession out of Campfire area humming the tune for Vespers!



------------------------------------------------------------------------



Campfire Opening



Cub Scouts of Pack 383 -- We are gathered here for our graduation campfire. This is a special occasion, a special tradition which has special memories! "At the first camp, on Brownsea Island, Baden-Powell and the boys were winding down at the last campfire. Baden-Powell during the campfire told the boys that a campfire was a special time of fellowship, spirituality, and good fun. He told the boys that he wouldn't be around forever, and that to keep the spirit of this time alive, he invited them to take some of the campfire ashes, when they cooled, and to spread them on all the future campfires they would be at. This way the spirit of the first

scout camp would live on forever."



To help start our campfire this evening I've brought with me ashes from last years campfire! These ashes contain the memories of that campfire and the fun we had. By adding them to our campfire this year we will build new memories of our campfire this year! I ask that all scouts take a few moments to think of the good times you've had in Cub Scouting!



[Have a moment of silence to let the boys reflect]



I need your help in starting the campfire! Yell after me everything I say!



[Hold the bag of ashes up and face each of the directions (N, E, S, W) and yell out the following to add mystery to the fire lighting.]



Leader Shouts:

Boy's Shout:

(Face to the North)

To the North we call 

Spirit Red

Thy Hunger must be Fed

(Face to the East)

To the East we call 

Spirit Hot

Forget us not

(Face to the South)

To the South we call

Spirit Gold

As the year grows old

Keep us from the cold

(Face to the West

To the West we call

Spirit White

In the darkness of the night

Be our shining light



[Pour the ashes over the campfire. Using one of the many 'magic campfire' starts ignite the campfire! As it may take a few seconds for the fire to ignite, I will have the boys chant 'Cub Scouts' loudly saying it is the Spirit of Scouting that lights our fire.]



I now declare the camp fire open!





Webelos Graduation Ceremony



Since most Packs and Troops are getting ready for Bridging Ceremonies, I thought I would share a program we found to work very nicely. We performed this before sundown by a pond that has a bridge leading over to an island.



First the Cubmaster, graduating Webelos and family members go onto the ponds island. A section of the island trail is used to setup the stations with the Mileposts.



The Cub Scout Milepost and Boy Scout Bridging Ceremony Personnel: Cubmaster, New Scout and his Parents, Senior Patrol Leader, Scoutmaster and Troop.



Equipment: red loops, neckerchief & slide , table, lanterns, candles, mileposts to hang Cub Rank Signs Mileposts



Cubmaster: (addressing audience): Cub Scouting is the younger boy part of the great Scouting movement. In the final months of his Cub Scouting experience, a boy learns the requirements for the Scout badge. He decides what troop he will join and with his parents arranges for his entrance into Scouting on his 11th birthday. tonight our pack has the privilege of bringing another group of Webelos Scouts to this milepost.



Cubmaster: We are now going to relive the Cub Scout experiences of our boys who are ready to cross over the bridge into Boy Scouting. You started your Cub Scout careers as Bobcats. You were at least 8 years of age, or had completed the second grade. You had to learn the Cub Scout Promise, the Law of the Pack, the handshake, and the salute. So you started your journey on the Bobcat trail. You looked ahead and saw that the trail went through a comparatively level "Wolf Valley." (Boys and parents lead to Wolf Card".)



Cubmaster: As you went through "Wolf Valley," you worked on your physical and mental skills until you had passed 12 achievements. You passed these achievements with your parents or at your den meetings. You were growing; you mastered "Wolf Valley." Raise your heads and look where the trail leads now--up and up. Your next goal was "Bear Mountain." (Boys and parents are lead to Bear Card".)



Cubmaster: As you progressed up the trail toward Bear Mountain, you found the achievements a little more difficult because you were growing both physically and mentally and more was expected of you. You passed your 12 required achievements and were encouraged to work on electives, both Wolf and Bear. A year passed and you reached the top of Bear Mountain, and could now see ahead of you the Lodge of the Webelos. Your guides on the trail now changed and fathers became the leaders who worked with you. (Boys and parents are lead to "Webelos /Arrow of Light Card" .)



Cubmaster: You were a member of the Webelos den. Now it was strictly between you and your leaders whether you wanted to work for the Arrow of Light Award or just wanted to be a member. You remained a Webelos Scout until you reached the age of 11, when you became eligible to join a Boy Scout troop. You've worked hard in the Webelos den and are now ready to take your next step on the Scouting trail by crossing over the bridge to further adventure. (At this Point they have completed the Milestones and are at the foot of the Bridge.)



Cubmaster: Our accomplishments are never made without help. And significant in __________________'s (graduate's name) growth has been the help he has received from his parents. I thank you for the help you have given your son and your cooperation with his den and pack leaders. Of course, we shall miss you as you move on into Scouting, but we are honored to present Troop 759 with such an outstanding family. All of us wish you continued success as you climb the Scouting trail.



Senior Patrol Leader: Greets the New Scout and his family. Presents candle to Scout and escorts him & his family across the bridge. Scout Places candle on Bridging ceremony table.



Scoutmaster: __________________________ (Scouts name), it is a privilege to welcome you and your family into Troop 759. Scouting will offer you the fun of outdoor activities, the challenge of leadership, and the chance to build self confidence through skills that will last you a lifetime.



Scout Master : Gives Troop #s and Red Loops to each Scout Family .



Senior Patrol Leader: Red Loops signify you are a Boy Scout and when they are worn upon your shoulders you are promising to follow the Scout Law. Would the parents please remove the Cub Scout Loops and put on Boy Scout Loops.



Scout Master : Gives Troop Neckerchief and slide to each Scout Family .



Senior Patrol Leader: Would the parents please remove the Cub Scout Neckerchief and put on the Troop Neckerchief. The neckerchief has many uses as you will learn. There's one use, though, that you may not think of and that is to remind you of the Scout Oath. The neckerchief is a triangle, and its three corners should remind you of something you recently learned--our Scout Oath. The Oath, you remember, has three corners, too--duty to God and country, duty to others, and duty to self. From now on, every time you put on your neckerchief it should remind you of the things you pledge each time you repeat the Scout Oath.



Scout Master & Senior Patrol Leader : Scout Salute and Handshake with the New Scout. Repeat this for each Scout that is bridging



The New Scouts are greeted by the members of the Troop as they complete the bridging ceremony.



(A small picnic style buffet is provided by the mothers of the bridging Webelos).



The Scout Benediction Have all stand, form a circle, join hands (right over left), bow their heads, and repeat together: "May the Great Master of all Scouts be with us until we meet again." Then the Scouts leave the area quietly.



Webelos Graduation Ceremony



As a cub master, and latter a Webelos den leader, and father or 2 scouts, my favorite Webelos ceremonies were simple. It was a ceremony where you have a large arrow, made from wood, like a 2x4, with seven candles. With a little more skill you could make it look more like the real ARROW of light, and add the arch/sun. You start in a almost dark room with ONLY the spirit candle burning, and read the explanation of the arrow of light, and the meaning of each of the seven rays.

I then would present an arrow to each Webelos, with a attached feather that would have his name, and the date of the ceremony. The badge would go to his mom, to present to the scout, and the card to his dad, to present to the scout.



I recently saw an electric version of the arrow, with electric candles that we lit by some remote "magic".



I might add that you may be able to get some help from you local Order of the Arrow chapter to help present the arrows. It adds a nice touch to have the arrows presented by a scout in Indian dress. Our chapter used to have a ceremony all prepared.



Webelos Graduation Ceremony



We had a cross-over ceremony at our pack meeting on Monday night, and seven Webelos crossed over to two different troops (I got five in mine, thank Heavens--I'm now up to 12 scouts).



We used an outer space theme this time. I have a Captain Picard suit I wear at Halloween, and a working toy ray gun. We started out by dimming the lights and playing over the speaker system at full volume Strauss' "Thus Spake Zarathustra," more familiarly known as the theme from "200l: A Space Odyssey."



I came out and tried to light the "campfire" but had no matches. "Great Denibian slime devils, I'm out of matches!" I bellowed in my most stentorian starship commander's voice. "I'll have to speak to Riker about this immediately!" But I solve the problem by lighting the campfire with a blast from my ray gun (my ASM turned the dimmer switch up to full slowly). Then I leisurely warmed my hands, and turned around and warmed my posterior (giggles here, as intended).



Then I turned to the WDL, and said, "Commander Keith, I understand you have seven graduates from the star fleet academy who are ready to join the crews of starships 113 and 1515. Bring them up here immediately!"



Anyway, you get the idea. Bring the boys up, congratulate them on their accomplishments, wish them well in boy scouting, and then cross them over the bridge, where they are received by a representative from their new troops. We also give them boy scout neckerchiefs; my troop has a custom-made one we give each new scout.



Another thing we do--I have each boy sign our cross-over bridge with an indelible magic marker before they actually cross over. Who knows? We may have a president's signature on there someday.



At the end, we played the theme from "Star Wars", also LOUD. Very inspiring.



This is a fun ceremony and seemed to work well. The boys really liked it--didn't want me to turn off "Star Wars," so we played it as a finale when they were leaving the pack meeting.



Each of the seven boys also received his Arrow of Light in a separate ceremony earlier in the meeting. On a personal note, one of the seven was a kid I've known since moments after his birth--my son Walker. This is the first of what I hope will be many times his accomplishments outshine my own. Needless to say, I'm beaming



Native American Theme Graduation Ceremony



White Eagle Crossover Ceremony



Participants:



Akela, Scoutmaster, SPL, White Eagle, tom-tom drummer, candidates and Boy Scouts (one for each crossover candidate)



Setup:



Council fire (simulated or real), Crossover bridge or arch, Indian costume, tom-tom, peace pipe, and twig for each crossover candidate.



[The lights are turned down, if indoors.]



START:



AKELA: [ Akela calls for the Council fire to light.. ]



"GREAT SPIRIT LIGHT OUR FIRE"



[The council fire is lit.]



[Akela signals for the drums to be gin... Waves staff in direction of drummer]



White Eagle Enters Ceremonial area. He cradles a peace pipe in his arms. He slowly walks to the center, facing North lifts the peace pipe to the sky, and says in a loud voice:



"To live and help live".



He turns to the East lifting the peace pipe to the sky, and says in a loud voice:



"To live and help live".



He turns to the West lifting the peace pipe to the sky., and says in a loud voice:



"To live and help live".



He turns to the South lifting the peace pipe to the sky, and says in a loud voice:



"To live and help live".



[ He moves to the back of the Ceremonial area to observe the bridge crossing.



When WHITE EAGLE stops, the tom-tom stops. ]



AKELA: Will the following crossover candidates come forward and stand before the council fire;



[READ NAMES]



AKELA: You have climbed the Cub Scouting trail, completing ever more difficult achievements. These ceremonies mark the completion of your Cub Scouting adventures. Now as you travel to the land of Boy Scouting, place your twig on the fire, symbolizing your desire to help, as you have been helped.



[ Candidates place twigs on the fire ]



It is now time for you to cross the bridge (or walk under the arch). Before you begin your journey, please remove your neckerchief. You will give it to me before you embark onto the bridge.



[Candidates remove neckerchief]



Will each of you please step onto the bridge and begin your crossover.



[ As the candidates pass before Akela, they give him their neckerchief, and he shakes their hand with the Cub Scout handshake for the last time. ]



[ The Candidates cross the bridge. When they reach the Boy Scout side, the Scoutmaster and SPL shake their hands with the Boy Scout handshake. Each Boy Scout takes one of the Cubs and stands with him. ]



SPL: As Senior Patrol Leader of Troop ###, I welcome you to our troop.


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