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Baloo's Bugle

 

April 2005 Cub Scout Roundtable Issue

Volume 11, Issue 9
May 2005 Theme
 

Theme: Pet Pals
Webelos: Sportsman & Outdoorsman
  Tiger Cub
Activities

 

AUDIENCE PARTICIPATIONS

Little Rabbit

Baltimore Area Council

Divide the audience into 4 groups. Each group says the indicated words whenever they hear “their” word in the story.

Little Rabbit:     “Hoppity Hop”

Mother Rabbit: “Oh Dear”
Feather:             “Flutter, Flutter”

Forest:               “Rustle, Rustle”

There was once a LITTLE RABBIT who didn’t mind MOTHER RABBIT very well; and never, never told her where he was going when he went out to play. This one particular day, LITTLE RABBIT was playing just outside his house when a pretty FEATHER came floating by. Now this LITTLE RABBIT found that when he threw the FEATHER in to the air, the wind would carry it tumbling along. The poor LITTLE RABBIT completely forgot MOTHER RABBIT’S orders about not straying and kept throwing and following the FEATHER until he was deep, deep into the FOREST.

All of a sudden, LITTLE RABBIT discovered that he was lost. This part of the FOREST was strange to him. LITTLE RABBIT forgot all about his FEATHER and started running and running, trying to find his way home, Everywhere LITTLE RABBIT ran, the FOREST grew stranger and stranger. He missed MOTHER RABBIT very much. LITTLE RABBIT knew MOTHER RABBIT would be worried about him and he felt so foolish for following the FEATHER without watching how far he was going. Then LITTLE RABBIT saw a deer and asked the deer if he could tell him how to get back to his home at the edge of the FOREST. The deer could not tell him and this made LITTLE RABBIT even sadder. He wished so much that he had minded MOTHER RABBIT and not wandered into the FOREST chasing the FEATHER.

About now, though, MOTHER RABBIT was starting to search for LITTLE RABBIT. The animals along the way told MOTHER RABBIT about LITTLE RABBIT chasing a FEATHER into the FOREST. All the animals thought he was so foolish. LITTLE RABBIT was thinking about how the sun came rising over the FOREST each morning, and disappeared over the meadow at night. So LITTLE RABBIT decided that if he followed the sun as it crossed the sky, it would lead him through the FOREST to home. As LITTLE RABBIT was running and following the sun, he thought of how foolish it was not to listen to MOTHER RABBIT. Ahead of him, LITTLE RABBIT saw MOTHER RABBIT and his heart leaped with joy; and he vowed to never disobey her again.

THE LOST LIZARD

Piedmont Council

Divide Audience into four groups.  Assign each group an action that goes with one of the key words.  Practice the actions & noises as you are assigning groups.

CUB SCOUT: Make sign & say, “I’ll do my best.”

LIZARD: Slide feet on floor & say, “Scurry, scurry.”

CAP: Pantomime putting on cap and say “thoomp” as the cap hits your head

COAT: Pantomime putting on coat then say, “Ziiiiiip” as you zip up your coat

Also, have the audience follow the narrator in pantomime as he tells the story

Once there was a CUB SCOUT who had a pet LIZARD that he kept in a box. One day the CUB SCOUT looked in the box and the LIZARD was gone. “I guess I’ll have to put on my CAP and COAT and look for my LIZARD,” he said. So the CUB SCOUT put on his CAP and his COAT and he put the box in his COAT pocket and went outside to look for the missing LIZARD.

First, the CUB SCOUT looked under the porch (pantomime looking under porch). No LIZARD. Next, the CUB SCOUT looked behind a tree (pantomime). No LIZARD. Then the CUB SCOUT looked in the bushes (pantomime). No LIZARD.

Just as the CUB SCOUT was losing hope of finding his lost LIZARD, the March wind came around the corner of the house and blew the CUB SCOUT’S CAP off. Holding his COAT tightly around him, with the box in his COAT pocket, the CUB SCOUT ran down the street after his CAP (pantomime).

The CUB SCOUT chased his CAP past the fire hydrant to the street corner. After looking carefully both ways (pantomime), the CUB SCOUT ran across the street after his CAP. The wind was blowing strong, so the CUB SCOUT held his COAT tightly around him as he chased the CAP into the park.

Finally the March wind put the CAP down on a rock, and the CUB SCOUT caught up with it. And when the CUB SCOUT picked up his CAP, what do you think he saw? There on the rock, under the CAP, was his lost LIZARD!

He picked up the LIZARD, put it in the box, put the box in his COAT pocket, put his CAP on his head and went straight home.

When he got inside the house, the CUB SCOUT took off his COAT and his CAP and took the LIZARD out of the box. To his surprise, he discovered that this wasn’t his missing LIZARD after all. Sitting quietly on his desk, the CUB

SCOUT found his own LIZARD.

“Oh well,” said the CUB SCOUT. “I’ll take the new LIZARD to the den meeting this afternoon. Mrs. Smith will put him in our den zoo. Won’t she be proud of me?” And with that, the CUB SCOUT put both LIZARDS in the box and went outside to play...after putting on his CAP and COAT, of course.

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