U. S. Scouting Service Project at http://usscouts.org

BOY SCOUT
ADVANCEMENT
REQUIREMENT CHANGES

Effective: January 1, 2002
(or during the year in some cases)

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When there is a conflict between two published lists of requirements, such as the Requirements Book and a Merit Badge Pamphlet, the Requirements Book should be considered to be the controlling document, until a newer edition of the Requirements Book is issued, EXCEPT when the pamphlet has a later issue date.

BSA is in the process of updating ALL 120 merit badge books, with the goal of updating all of them within 4-5 years (a rate of around 25 per year). As new pamphlets are issued, when they contain new requirements, Scouts will have the option of starting with the new requirements as soon as the pamphlets are issued, or they may start work using the old requirements until the next edition of Boy Scout Requirements is issued.

They will NOT be holding the publications up until January each year, just issuing them as they are completed (and old stocks exhausted, probably). Then in January, the Requirements Book will include all revisions to date.

The following Merit Badges had new pamphlets issued either at or subsequent to the 2001 BSA National Jamboree, with new requirements:

Traffic Safety, Metalwork, Wood Carving.

Changes were also made to the Second Class and First Class rank requirements.

Those revisions are in the new Requirements Book and took effect when the new booklets were issued.

In addition, a new FLY FISHING Merit Badge was field tested at the Jamboree. The official announcement of the new badge with the official requirements was made in May, 2002, and the pamphlet became available in June, 2002.

New pamphlets for Fishing and Dentistry Merit Badges were also released around June 1, 2002, with new requirements.

A new pamphlet for Landscape Architecture Merit Badge was released around October 1, 2002, with new requirements.


REVISED RANK REQUIREMENTS
(in the 2002 Requirements Book)

Second Class
First Class

COMPLETELY REPLACED
(or EXTENSIVELY REWRITTEN)
MERIT BADGE REQUIREMENTS
(Issued between the 2001 and 2002 Requirements Books)

Metalwork
Traffic Safety
Wood Carving

COMPLETELY REPLACED
(or EXTENSIVELY REWRITTEN)
MERIT BADGE REQUIREMENTS
(in the 2002 Requirements Book)

Cooking

REVISED MERIT BADGE REQUIREMENTS
(in the 2002 Requirements Book)

Art
Cinematography
Lifesaving
Radio
Rifle Shooting
Swimming
Wilderness Survival

REVISED MERIT BADGE REQUIREMENTS
(New Pamphlets issued during the year)

Dentistry
Fishing
Landscape Architecture

NEW MERIT BADGE

Fly Fishing


Second Class

The footnote to Requirements 7b and 7c which read, "This requirement may be waived by the troop committee for medical or safety reasons." has been removed (This was actually removed, without notice, in 2001.) A Scout who is unable to complete these requirements must follow the procedure for Scouts who are physically or mentally disabled to get permission to use alternate requirements.


First Class

Old Requirement 9c, the swimming survival skills demonstration (jumping into water with clothes on) was deleted (and moved to Swimming Merit Badge -see below). Requirement 9d was renumbered to 9c,

The footnote to Requirement 9b which read, "This requirement may be waived by the troop committee for medical or safety reasons." has been removed (This was actually removed, without notice, in 2001.) A Scout who is unable to complete these requirements must follow the procedure for Scouts who are physically or mentally disabled to get permission to use alternate requirements.


Art

A minor change was made to requirement 6. ("Markers" was removed from the list of art supplies.)


Cinematography

Most of the requirements were expanded and clarified. The requirements now read as follows.

  1. Explain and demonstrate the proper elements of a good motion picture.

    1. Visual storytelling

    2. Rhythm

    3. The 180-degree axis rule

    4. Camera movement

    5. Framing and composition of camera shots

    6. Lens selection

  2. Do the following:

    1. Tell the story you plan to film in a three- or four-paragraph treatment. How does it read on paper?

    2. Prepare a storyboard for your motion picture (This can be done with rough sketches and stick figures.)

    3. Demonstrate six of the following motion picture shooting techniques.

      1. Using a tripod

      2. Panning a camera

      3. Framing a shot

      4. Selecting an angle

      5. Selecting proper lighting

      6. Hand-held shooting

    4. Do ONE of the following, using motion picture techniques in planning a program for your troop or school. Start with a treatment , and complete the requirement by presenting the program to the troop, patrol, or class.

      1. Film or videotape a court of honor and show it to an audience.

      2. Create a minifeature of your own design using the techniques you learn.

      3. Film or videotape a vignette that could be used to train a new Scout in a Scouting Skill.

  3. Do ONE of the following:

    1. Visit a film set or a television production studio and watch how production work is done.

    2. Explain to your counselor the elements of the zoom lens and three important parts.

  4. Explain the following jobs related to film or video production: director, producer, cinematographer, key grip, gaffer, best boy, assistant camera operator.


Cooking

The requirements were completely rewritten, and read as follows:

  1. Do the following:

    1. Review with your counselor the injuries that might arise from cooking, including burns and scalds, and the proper treatment.

    2. Describe how meat, fish, chicken, eggs, dairy products, and fresh vegetables should be stored, transported, and properly prepared for cooking.

    3. Describe the following food-related illnesses and tell what you can do to help prevent each from happening:

      1. Salmonella enteritis

      2. Staphylococcal enteritis

      3. E. coli (Escherichia coli) enteritis

      4. Botulism

      5. Trichinosis

      6. Hepatitis

  2. Do the following:

    1. Illustrate for your counselor the food pyramid. Label the pyramid, including:

      1. The food groups

        1. Milk, yogurt, and cheese group

        2. Vegetable group

        3. Meats, poultry, fish, dry beans, eggs, and nuts group

        4. Fruit group

        5. Bread, cereal, rice, and pasta group

      2. The item on the pyramid that is not considered part of a food group and tell why its use is discouraged

      3. The number of servings recommended per day from each group

    2. Give your counselor examples from each food group.

    3. Describe for your counselor the measurements of servings for each food group.

    4. Describe to your counselor food preparation techniques that result in more healthful and nutritious meals.

  3. Plan a menu for two straight days (six meals) of camping. Include the following:

    1. A camp dinner with soup; meat, fish, poultry, or an appropriate substitute; two fresh vegetables; drink; and dessert. All are to be properly prepared. When preparing your menu, follow the nutritional guidelines set by the food pyramid.

    2. A one-pot dinner. Use foods other than canned.

    3. Using the menu planned for requirement 3, make a food list showing cost and amount needed to feed three or more boys.

    4. List the utensils needed to cook and serve these meals.

  4. Using the menu planned for requirement 3, do the following and discuss the process with your merit badge counselor:

    1. Prepare and server for yourself and two others, the two dinners, one lunch, and one breakfast. Time your cooking so that each course will be ready to serve at the proper time.

      The meals for this requirement may be prepared for different trips. They need not be prepared consecutively. Scouts working on this badge at summer camp should plan around food they can get at the camp commissary.

    2. For meals prepared in requirement 4a for which a fire is needed, use a lightweight stove or build a low-impact fire. Include support for your cooking utensils from rocks, logs, or like material. The same fireplace may be used for more than one meal. Use a backpacking stove to cook at least one meal. (Where local regulations do not allow you to do this, the counselor may change the requirement to meet the law.)

    3. For each meal prepared in requirement 4a, use safe food-handling practices. Dispose of garbage, cans, foil, paper, and other rubbish by packing them out and depositing them in a proper container. After each meal, clean up the site thoroughly.

  5. Plan a menu for one day (three meals) or for four meals over a two-day period of trail hiking or backpacking. Include the following:

    1. A breakfast, lunch, and dinner for a trail or backpacking trip where light weight is important. You should be able to store all foods used for several days without refrigeration. When preparing your menu, follow the nutritional guidelines set by the food pyramid.

      The meals for this requirement may be prepared for different trips. They need not be prepared consecutively. Scouts working on this badge at summer camp should plan around food they can get at the camp commissary.

    2. Using the menu planned for requirement 5, make a food list showing cost and amount needed to feed three or more boys.

    3. List the utensils needed to cook and serve these meals.

    4. Figure the weight of the foods in requirement 4a.

  6. Using the menu planned for requirement 5a, do the following:

    1. Prepare and serve for yourself and two others, the trail breakfast and dinner. Time your cooking so that each course will be ready to serve at the proper time.

      The meals for this requirement may be prepared for different trips. They need not be prepared consecutively. Scouts working on this badge at summer camp should plan around food they can get at the camp commissary.

    2. Use an approved trail stove (with proper supervision) or charcoal to prepare your meals.

    3. For each meal prepared in requirement 6a, use safe food-handling practices. Dispose of garbage, cans, foil, paper, and other rubbish by packing them out and depositing them in a proper container. After each meal, clean up the site thoroughly.

  7. Plan a menu for three full days of meals (breakfast, lunch, and dinner) to be cooked at home.

    1. When preparing your menu, follow the nutritional guidelines set by the food pyramid. All meals are to be cooked or properly prepared.

    2. Using the menu planned for requirement 7, make a food list, showing cost and amount needed to feed yourself and at least one adult (parent, family member, guardian, or other responsible adult).

    3. Tell what utensils were needed to cook and serve these meals.

    4. Prepare and serve a breakfast, lunch, and dinner from the menu you planned for requirement 7. Time your cooking to have each course ready to serve at the proper time. Have an adult verify the preparation of the meal to your counselor.

  8. Do the following:

    1. Find out what opportunities are available for a career in food service management. Find out what high school courses might help you prepare for a career in cooking, and about special training you might need and where to obtain such training. Discuss what you learned with your counselor.

    2. Visit a professional cook, chef, food service manager, or Registered Dietician and learn what this professional's duties are. Discuss the person's education and training, techniques, and means used in professional food preparation, and local health regulations and licensing requirements that must be followed. Report to your counselor your findings.


Dentistry

The requirements were revised when a new pamphlet was issued in June, and now read as follows:

  1. Using x-ray (radiographic) films and with your counselor's guidance, study the tooth structure and look for decay. Then do the following:

    1. Using the radiographs as a guide, draw a lower molar. Label its parts and surfaces. Show surrounding structures such as bone and gum tissues.

    2. Show on your drawing where the nerves and blood vessels enter the tooth.

    3. Show on your drawing where bacterial plaque is most likely to be found.

  2. Do the following:

    1. Tell or write about what causes dental decay and gum disease. Tell how each of the following contributes to dental decay and gum disease: bacterial plaque, sugars, and acid.

    2. Tell the possible causes for traumatic tooth loss, describe the types of mouth guards used to prevent tooth trauma, and list the athletic activities during which a person should wear a mouth guard.

    3. Explain the first-aid procedure for saving a tooth that has been knocked out.

  3. Arrange for a visit with a dentist. Before you go, ask whether your visit can include a dental examination and a plaque-control demonstration. Afterward, ask questions about things you want to know. Then tell your counselor what the dentist does in a checkup examination.

  4. Do TWO of the following:

    1. Name at least five instruments and five pieces of equipment a dentist uses.

    2. With the help of a dentist, prepare a dental stone cast using a vibrator, a mixing bowl, a water measure, a plastic measure, model stone, and a spatula.

    3. Keep a record of everything you eat for three days. Circle those that could provide the sugars that bacterial plaque needs to make acid. List snacks that you should avoid to maintain the best oral health.

  5. Discuss with your merit badge counselor the following

    1. How fluorides help prevent tooth decay and the ways fluorides can be provided to the teeth.

    2. How the mouth is related to the rest of the body. Topics might include chewing, saliva, enzymes, nutrition, and speech.

  6. Do TWO of the following:

    1. Make a model tooth of soap, clay, papier-mâché, or wax. Using a string and a large hand brush, show your troop or a school class proper toothbrushing and flossing procedures.

    2. Make a poster on prevention of dental disease. Show the importance of good oral health.

    3. Collect at least five advertisements for different toothpastes. List the claims that each one makes. Tell about the accuracy of the advertisements.

    4. Write a feature story for your school newspaper on the proper care of teeth and gums.

    5. Make drawings and write about the progress of dental decay. Describe the types of dental filling and treatments a dentist can use to repair dental decay problems.

  7. Do the following:

    1. Report on careers in dentistry. Tell about the different specialties of dentistry and briefly tell what each specialist does.

    2. Prepare a four-part summary of jobs in dentistry. Under the headings "Dentist," "Dental Hygienist," "Dental Assistant," and "Dental Laboratory Technician," list for each job the duties, education, costs of education, length of training required, and other information to describe these jobs.


Fishing

The requirements were revised when a new pamphlet was issued in June, and now read as follows:

  1. Explain to your counselor the injuries that could occur while fishing and the proper treatment, including cuts, scratches, puncture wounds, insect bites, hypothermia, dehydration, and heat reactions. Explain how to remove a hook that has lodged in your arm. Name and explain five safety practices you should always follow while fishing.

  2. Learn and explain the differences between two types of fishing outfits. Point out and identify the parts of several types of rods and reels. Explain how and when each would be used. Review with your counselor how to care for this equipment.

  3. Demonstrate the proper use of two different types of fishing equipment.

  4. Demonstrate how to tie the following knots: clinch, palomar, turle, blood loop (barrel knot), and the surgeon's loop. Explain how each knot is used and when to use it.

  5. Name and identify five basic artificial lures and five natural baits and explain how to fish with them. Explain why bait fish are not to be released.

  6. Explain the importance of practicing Leave No Trace and how it positively affects fishing resources.

  7. Give the regulations affecting game fishing where you live. Explain why they were adopted and what you accomplish by following these regulations.

  8. Explain what good outdoor sportsmanlike behavior is and how it relates to fishermen. Tell how the Outdoor Code of the Boy Scouts of America relates to a fishing sports enthusiast, including the aspects of littering, trespassing, courteous behavior, and obeying fishing regulations.

  9. Catch two different kinds of fish and identify them. Release at least one of them unharmed. Clean and cook another fish.


Fly Fishing

This is a new badge, increasing the number of available merit badges to 120. The new pamphlet became available in June. The requirements DO NOT appear in the Requirements Book.

  1. Explain to your counselor the injuries that could occur while fly-fishing and the proper treatment, including cuts, scratches, puncture wounds, insect bites, hypothermia, and heat reactions. Explain how to remove a hook that has lodged in your arm. Name and explain five safety practices you should always follow while fly-fishing.

  2. Discuss how to match a fly rod, line and leader to get a balanced system. Discuss several types of fly lines, and explain how and when each would be used. Review with your counselor how to care for this equipment.

  3. Demonstrate how to tie proper knots to prepare a fly rod for fishing:

    1. Tie a backing to a fly reel spool using the arbor backing knot

    2. Attach backing to fly line using the nail knot

    3. Attach a leader to fly line using the needle knot, nail knot or loop-to-loop connection

    4. Add tippet to a leader using a double surgeon’s loop or blood knot

    5. Tie a fly onto the terminal end of the leader using the improved clinch knot

  4. Explain how each of the following types of flies are used: dry flies, wet flies, nymphs, streamers, bass bugs and poppers. What does each imitate? Tie at least two types of the flies mentioned in this requirement.

  5. Demonstrate the ability to cast a fly consistently and accurately using overhead and roll cast techniques.

  6. Go to a suitable fishing location and make observations on the types of insects fish may be eating. Look for flying insects and some that may be on or beneath the water’s surface. Look under rocks. Explain the importance of matching the hatch.

  7. Explain the importance of practicing Leave No Trace and how it positively affects fly-fishing resources.

  8. Obtain a copy of the regulations affecting game fishing where you live. Explain why they were adopted and what you accomplish by following them.

  9. Explain what good outdoor sportsmanlike behavior is and how it relates to fishermen. Tell how the Outdoor Code of the Boy Scouts of America relates to a fishing enthusiast, including the aspects of littering, trespassing, courteous behavior, and obeying fishing regulations.

  10. Using the fly-fishing techniques you have learned, catch two different kinds of fish and identify them. Release at least one of them unharmed. Clean and cook another fish.


Landscape Architecture

The requirements were revised when a new pamphlet was issued in October, and now read as follows:

  1. Explain the differences between a landscape architect and a horticulturist, a landscape contractor, an architect, an urban planner, and a civil engineer. Give an example of the work each might do that is unique to that vocation. How might people in these positions work with a landscape architect.
  2. Do ONE of the following:
    1. Visit a landscape architect's office or invite a landscape architect to your troop meeting to tell about his or her work. Find out about and discuss the following with your merit badge counselor:
      1. What a landscape architect's daily work is like.
      2. The education one must have to be a professional landscape architect.
      3. The methods used in developing a design.
      4. The drawing tools and computer equipment used in design.
    2. Log on to the American Society of Landscape Architects' Web site at http://www.ASLA.org and find out more about the landscape architecture profession and schools that educate landscape architects. Using documents printed from this Web site, report to your counselor what you have learned.

  3. Go to a completed landscape project that a landscape architect has designed. Before you visit the site, obtain a plan of the design from the landscape architect if one is available.
  4. Make a report in the form of a short talk to your Scout troop on what you found in requirement 3. Discuss the following:
    1. Tell whether the design had separate spaces, a clear path system, and sun and shade variety.
    2. Tell about the places to sit, eat, or park a car.
    3. Tell whether you were always comfortable and protected.
    4. Tell about some of the trees, shrubs, and ground covers used in the design.
  5. Identify five shrubs, five trees, and one ground cover, being sure that you select examples of different shapes, sizes, and textures. With the help of your counselor or a local nursery, choose plants that will grow in your area. Bring pictures of the different planting materials or, if possible, examples of their branches, leaves, or flowers to a troop meeting. Be prepared to tell how you might use each in the design of a landscape.
  6. Look at and study a place of worship or school grounds to find the place where most people arrive by bus or car. Show you can do the following:
    1. Using a measuring tape, measure and draw the entry and its nearby area using a scale of 1/8 inch equal to 1 foot on an 11-by-17-inch piece of paper. Be sure to include the driveway and the wall and door where people enter the school or place of worship. Indicate any sidewalks, structures, trees, and plants within the study area. Make a copy of this plan to save the original. Do the next two items on copies.
    2. On one copy, use directional arrows to indicate where the water drains across the site, where ditches occur, and where water stands for a longer period of time.
    3. Decide how you can make the place safer and more comfortable for those using it. Redesign the area on another copy of the plan. You may want to include new walks, covered waiting areas, benches, space-defining plantings of trees and shrubs, and drainage structures.

Lifesaving

The survival swimming test was moved to the Swimming Merit Badge, from First Class requirement 9c. This change was omitted in the printed text for Lifesaving Merit badge in the Requirements Book.


Metalwork

This Merit badge has been completely rewritten to more accurately reflect the vocations / avocations in the general area of Metalworking. The requirements now read as follows:

  1. Read the safety rules listed in the Metalwork merit badge pamphlet. Describe to your counselor how to be safe while working with metal. Because this merit badge offers four options, show your counselor which additional safety rules apply to the discipline you choose and discuss them with your counselor.

  2. Do the following:

    1. Define the term native metal.

    2. Define the term malleable.

    3. Define the term metallurgy.

    4. Define the term alloy.

    5. Name two nonferrous alloys used by pre-Iron Age metalworkers, and name the metals that are combined to form these alloys.

    6. Explain the term ferrous, and name three ferrous alloys used by modern metalworkers.

    7. Describe how to work–harden a metal.

    8. Describe how to anneal a non-ferrous and a ferrous metal.

  3. Do the following:

    1. Put a 45-degree bend in a small piece of 26- or 28-gauge sheet brass or sheet copper. Note the amount of effort that is required to overcome the yield point in this unworked piece of metal.

    2. Work-harden another piece of the same sheet brass or sheet copper. and then put a 45-degree bend in it. Note the amount of effort that is required to overcome the yield point.

    3. Soften the same bent, work hardened piece by annealing it and then try to remove the 45–degree bend. Note the amount of effort that is required to overcome the yield point.

    4. Join two small pieces of scrap metal using a hammered rivet. Repeat the process using a pop rivet.

    5. Using a flatlock seam, join two pieces of scrap metal together with either lead-free solder or silver solder.

    6. Make a temper color index from a flat piece of steel. Using hand tools, make and temper a center punch of medium-carbon or high-carbon steel.

    7. Using metal cans, practice using the basic metalworking tools and techniques by making at least two tasteful objects that require cutting, bending, and edging.

  4. Do ONE of the following:

    1. Visit an experienced sheet metal mechanic, tinsmith, coppersmith, jeweler, founder or a blacksmith at his or her workshop. You may select a skilled hobbyist or a professional. Ask permission to see the tools used and to examine examples of the work made at the shop. Inquire about the level of education required to become an apprentice craftsman.

    2. If you have (or your counselor has) access to the internet, explore metalworking occupations by conducting a Web search. With your counselor’s help and guidance, find at least five metalworking–related Web sites. Print a copy of the web pages and discuss them with your counselor. When conducting your Web search, use keywords such as metallurgy, metalwork, spinning metal, metal fabrication, steel fabrication, aluminum fabrication, casting metal, pattern making, welding, forge welding, blacksmith, art metal, Artist Blacksmith Association of North America, farrier, brazing, goldsmith, machinist, or sheet metal mechanic.

    3. After completing the first three requirements, complete at least ONE of the options listed below.

      1. Option 1 – Sheet Metal Mechanic / Tinsmith

        1. Name and describe the use of the basic sheet metalworking tools.

        2. Create a reasonably accurate sketch of two tasteful objects to make from sheet metal. Include each component's dimensions on your sketch.

        3. Using patterns provided either by your counselor or made by you, make at least two tasteful objects out of 24- or 26–gauge sheet metal. Use a metal that is appropriate to the object’s ultimate purpose.

          1. Both objects must be constructed using culling, bending, edging, and either soldering or brazing

          2. One object must include at least one riveted component

          3. If you do not make your objects from zinc-plated sheet steel or tin-plated sheet steel, preserve your work from oxidation.

      2. Option 2 - Silversmith

        1. Name and describe the use of the basic tools used by a silversmith.

        2. Create a reasonably accurate hand-drawn sketch of two tasteful objects to make from sheet silver. Include each component's dimensions on your sketch.

        3. Using patterns provided either by your counselor or made by you, make at least two tasteful objects out of 18- or 20–gauge sheet Copper. If you have prior silversmithing experience, you may substitute sterling silver, nickel silver, or lead free pewter.

          1. At least one object must include a sawed component you have made yourself.

          2. At least one object must include a sunken part you have made yourself.

          3. Both objects must include a soldered joint.

          4. Clean and polish your objects.

      3. Option 3 – Founder

        1. Name and describe the use of the basic parts of a two–piece mold. Name at least three different types of molds.

        2. Create a reasonably accurate sketch of two tasteful objects to cast in metal. Include the height, width, and length on the sketch.

        3. Do the following:

          1. Using a pattern provided by your counselor and another one made by yourself, make two molds. Position the pouring gates and vents yourself. Do not use copyrighted materials as patterns.

          2. Make a casting using a mold provided by your counselor and make a casting using the mold you have made. Use lead free pewter when casting each mold.

          3. Remove all evidence of gates, vents, and parting-line flash from your castings.

      4. Option 4 - Blacksmith

        1. Name and tell the use of the basic tools used by a blacksmith.

        2. Make a reasonably accurate sketch of two tasteful objects to hot-forge. Include each component’s dimensions on your sketch.

        3. Using low–carbon steel at least ¼ inch thick, perform the following exercises:

          1. Draw out by forging a taper.

          2. Use the horn of the anvil by forging a U-shaped bend.

          3. Twist steel by placing a decorative twist in a piece of square steel.

          4. Use the edge of the anvil to bend metal by forging an L–shaped bend.

        4. Using low-carbon steel at least ¼ inch thick, make at least two tasteful objects that require hot-forging.

          1. Include a decorative twist on one object.

          2. Include a hammer-riveted joint in one object.

        5. Preserve your work from oxidation.


Radio

Item 6c was changed from "Draw ten schematic symbols..." to "Draw eight schematic symbols ..."

Some minor changes were made in Requirement 7a (Amateur Radio):

  1. The following was added to the end of item 2:

    Properly log the real or simulated ham radio contact and record the signal report.

  2. Item 3 was deleted, and items 4-7 were renumbered as 3-6.

  3. Item 3 (former Item 4) was revised to delete reference to the former "Novice" Class radio license, which is no longer available. It now reads:

Explain some of the Technician Class license requirements and privileges. Explain who gives amateur radio exams.


Rifle Shooting

  1. Minor Changes were made to requirement 1c, f, g, h, and i., which now read as follows:

    1. Explain the need for, and use and types of, eye and hearing protection.

    2. Obtain a copy of the hunting laws for your state. Explain the main points of hunting laws in your state and give any special laws on the use of guns or ammunition.

    3. Identify and explain how you can join or be a part of shooting sports activities.

    4. Explain to your counselor the proper hygienic guidelines used in shooting.

    5. Give to your counselor a list of sources that you could contact for information on firearms and their use.

  2. Requirement 2, OPTION A (Modern Cartridge Rifles), had numerous editing changes and now reads as follows:

    1. Identify the three main parts of a rifle, and tell how they function.

    2. Identify and demonstrate the three fundamental rules for safe gun handling.

    3. Identify the two types of cartridges, their parts, and how they function.

    4. Explain to your counselor what a misfire, hangfire, and squib fire are, and explain the procedures to follow in response to each.

    5. Identify and demonstrate the five fundamentals of shooting a rifle safely.

    6. Identify and explain each rule for safe shooting.

    7. Demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and attitude necessary to safely shoot a rifle from the bench rest position or supported prone position while using the five fundamentals of rifle shooting.

    8. Identify the basic safety rules for cleaning a rifle, and identify the materials needed

    9. Demonstrate how to clean a rifle properly and safely.

    10. Discuss what points you would consider in selecting a rifle

    11. Using a .22 caliber rimfire rifle and shooting from a bench rest or supported prone position at 50 feet, fire five groups (three shots per group) that can be covered by a quarter. Using these targets, explain how to adjust sights to zero.

    12. Adjust sights to center the group on the target and fire five groups (five shots per group). According to the target used, each shot in the group must meet the following minimum score:

      1. A-32 targets - 9

      2. A-17 or TQ-1 targets - 7,

      3. A-36 targets - 5.

        Note: It is not always practical to adjust the sights (i.e. when using a borrowed fixed-sight rifle). For requirement 2l, you may demonstrate your ability to use the shooting fundamentals by shooting five shot groups (five shots per group) in which all shots can be covered by a quarter and then explain how to adjust the sights to zero the rifle.

  3. Requirement 2, OPTION B (Air Rifles), had numerous editing changes and now reads as follows:

    1. Identify the three main parts of an air rifle, and tell how they function.

    2. Identify and demonstrate the three fundamental rules for handling a rifle safely.

    3. Identify the two most common types of air rifle ammunition.

    4. Identify and demonstrate the five fundamentals of shooting a rifle.

    5. Identify and explain each rule for shooting an air rifle safely.

    6. Demonstrate the knowledge, skills and attitude necessary to safely shoot a target from the bench rest position or supported prone position while using the five fundamentals of rifle shooting.

    7. Identify the basic safety rules for cleaning an air rifle, and identify the materials needed.

    8. Demonstrate how to clean an air rifle safely.

    9. Discuss what points you would consider in selecting an air rifle.

    10. Using a BB gun or pellet air rifle and shooting from a bench rest or supported prone position at 15 feet for BB guns or 33 feet for air rifles, fire five groups (three shots per group) that can be covered by a quarter.

    11. Adjust sights to center the group on the target and fire five groups (five shots per group). According to the target used, each shot in the group must meet the following minimum score:

      1. BB rifle at 15 feet or 5 meters using TQ - 5 targets - 8.

      2. Pellet air rifle at 25 feet using TQ - 5 target - 8, at 33 feet or 10 meters using AR-1 targets - 6.

  4. Requirement 2, OPTION C (Muzzle Loading Rifles), had numerous editing changes and now reads as follows:

    1. Discuss a brief history of the development of muzzle-loading rifles.

    2. Identify principal parts of percussion and flintlock rifles and discuss how they function.

    3. Demonstrate and discuss the safe handling rules of muzzle-loading rifles.

    4. Identify the various grades of black powder and their proper use.

    5. Discuss proper safety procedures pertaining to black powder use and storage.

    6. Discuss proper components of a load.

    7. Identify proper procedures and accessories used for loading a muzzle-loading rifle.

    8. Demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and attitude necessary to safely shoot a muzzle-loading rifle on a range, including range procedures.

    9. Shoot a target with a muzzle-loading rifle using the five fundamentals of firing the shot.

    10. Identify the materials needed to clean a muzzle- loading rifle safely. Using these materials, demonstrate how to clean a muzzle-loading rifle safely.

    11. Identify the causes of a muzzle-loading rifle's failing to fire and explain or demonstrate proper correction procedures.

    12. Discuss what points you would consider in selecting a muzzle-loading rifle.

    13. Using a muzzle-loading rifle of any caliber and shooting from a bench rest or supported prone position, fire three groups (three shots per group) that can be covered by the base of a standard-size soft drink can.

    14. Center the group on the target and fire three groups (five shots per group). According to the target used, each shot in the group must meet the following minimum score:

      1. at 25 yards using NRA A-23 or NMLRA 50-yard targets - 7;

      2. at 50 yards using NRA A-25 or NMLRA 100 yard targets - 7.


Swimming:

Several Minor changes, and some major changes were made. The survival swimming test was moved to the Merit Badge, from First Class requirement 9c. The Scuba/Snorkeling and Competitive Swimming requirements were made an "either/or" choice. The Instructing requirement was removed.

  1. In Requirement 1 "sunburn" was deleted and "Dehydration" added to the list of ailments, and "stings" was changed to "stings and bites".

  2. A minor editing change was made to requirement 2, with no substantive change.

  3. In requirement 3, the list of First Class requirements was changed to match the actual requirements. (Deleting the survival skills test.)

  4. The survival test was added as Requirement 4, and requirements 4-8 renumbered as 5-9. Requirement 4 reads:

    Demonstrate survival skills by leaping into deep water wearing clothes (shoes, socks, swim trunks, long pants, belt, and long-sleeved shirt). Remove shoes and socks, remove and inflate the shirt, and show that you can float using the shirt for support. Remove and inflate the pants for support. Swim 50 feet using the inflated pants for support, then show how to reinflate the pants while using them for support.

  5. Requirement 7b (former 6b) was changed to read:

  6. Do a headfirst surface dive, pike, or tuck dive (pike or tuck), and bring the object up again.

  7. Former Requirements 7 and 9 were combined into new Requirement 8, which reads:

    Do ONE of the following:

    1. Demonstrate snorkeling and scuba diving knowledge:

      1. Demonstrate selection and fit of mask, snorkel, and fins; discuss safety in both pool and open-water snorkeling.

      2. Demonstrate proper use of mask, snorkel, and fins for underwater search and rescue.

      3. Describe the sport of scuba diving, and demonstrate your knowledge of BSA policies and procedures relating to this sport.

    OR

    1. Demonstrate the following competitive swimming skills:

      1. Racing dive from a pool edge or dock edge (no elevated dives from racing platforms or starting blocks)

      2. Racing form for 25 yards on one competitive stroke (front crawl, back crawl, breaststroke, or butterfly)

      3. Racing turns for the stroke that you chose in 8b(2), OR, if the camp facilities cannot accommodate the racing turn, repeat 8b(2) with and additional stroke.

      4. Describe the sport of competitive swimming

  8. Requirement 9 (old Requirement 8) was revised to clarify the types of dives which should be used. It now starts as follows:

    In water at least 8 feet deep, show a headfirst dive (kneeling start, bent-knee start, or standing dive) ...


Traffic Safety

The requirements have been completely revised and read as follows. Some of the previous requirements were retained, but revised slightly or rearranged, and new material was added.

  1. Do the following:

    1. Make a scrapbook containing 10 newspaper articles about serious traffic crashes. Prepare a summary table of facts in the articles indicating the number of people injured, the number killed, type of crash (single vehicle, head-on collision, etc.), time of occurrence, age of the driver, whether alcohol or drugs were involved, use of safety belts, and any other factors that were reported to have contributed to the crash (weather conditions, fatigue, construction, etc.). Discuss how these crashes could have been prevented.

    2. Describe how alcohol affects the human body and why this is a problem for safely driving a motor vehicle. Research the legal blood alcohol concentration in your state and the consequences for driving while intoxicated.

    3. Describe at least four factors to be considered when an engineer designs a road or highway. Explain how roadside hazards and road conditions contribute to the occurrence and seriousness of traffic crashes.

    4. Explain why a driver who is fatigued should not operate a motor vehicle. Describe how volunteer drivers can plan to be alert when transporting Scouting participants.

  2. Do the following:

    1. Identify the different types of occupant restraint systems used in motor vehicles. Describe how they work and their purpose for safety. Demonstrate how to properly wear lap and shoulder belts. Explain why it is important for drivers and passengers to wear safety belts at all times.

    2. List five safety features found in motor vehicles besides occupant restraint systems. Describe each feature, how each works, and how each contributes to safety.

  3. Do the following to show your knowledge of car care for safety maintenance:

    1. Using your family car or another vehicle, demonstrate that all lights and lighting systems in the vehicle are working. Describe the function and explain why each type of light is important to safe driving.

    2. Using your family car or another vehicle, demonstrate how to check tire pressure and identify the correct tire pressure for the vehicle. Explain why proper tire pressure is important to safe driving.

    3. Demonstrate a method to check for adequate tire tread. Explain why proper tread is important to safe driving.

    4. Demonstrate with a smear-and-clear test if the windshield wiper blades will clear the windshield completely or need to be replaced. Describe instances in good and bad weather when windshield washers are important to safe driving.

  4. Do the following:

    1. In a location away from traffic hazards, measure with a tape measure - not in a car - and mark off with stakes the distance that a car will travel during the time needed for decision and reaction, and the braking distances necessary to stop a car traveling 30, 50, and 70 miles per hour on dry, level pavement. Discuss how environmental factors such as bad weather and road conditions will affect the distance.

    2. Demonstrate the difference in nighttime visibility between a properly lit bicycle and rider (or a pedestrian) wearing reflective material and a bicycle and rider with no lights (or a pedestrian) dressed in dark clothing, without reflective material.

    3. Make a chart of standard traffic signs. Explain how color and shape are used to help road users recognize and understand the information presented. Explain the purpose of different types of sign: signals, and pavement markings.

    4. Describe at least three examples of traffic laws that apply to drivers of motor vehicles and that bicyclists must also obey.

  5. Do ONE of the following:

    1. Interview a traffic law enforcement officer in your community to identify what three traffic safety problems the officer is most concerned about. Discuss with your merit badge counselor possible ways to solve one of those problems.

    2. Initiate and organize an activity to demonstrate the importance of traffic safety. Activities could include making a traffic safety presentation before a school assembly, to classes of younger students, or to another large group of people; having a staged demonstration of the consequences of a crash, working with the police and paramedics; organizing a presentation to the students of your school by an emergency room doctor and/or nurse to describe their experiences with motor vehicle crash victims; organizing a clinic to demonstrate safe bicycle riding and helmet use.

    3. Accompanied by an adult, pick a safe place to observe traffic at a controlled intersection (traffic signal or stop sign) and survey (1) such violations as running a red light or stop sign; or (2) seat belt usage. Count the number of violations or number of drivers not wearing a seat belt. Record in general terms if the driver was young/old, male/ female. Discuss the findings with your merit badge counselor.

    4. Based on what you have learned so far, develop a checklist for a safe trip. Share the checklist with your merit badge counselor, and use the checklist whenever your family makes a vehicle trip. Include on the list the responsibilities of the driver and the passengers for before and during the trip.


Wilderness Survival

Minor changes were made to requirements 1, 2, 5, 7b, 7c, 10,11, and 12 which now read as follows:

  1. Show that you know first aid for injuries or illnesses likely to occur in backcountry outings, including hypothermia, heatstroke, heat exhaustion, frostbite, dehydration, sunburn, stings, tick bites, snakebite and blisters.

  2. Describe from memory the priorities for survival in a backcountry or wilderness location.

  3. Make up a personal survival kit and be able to explain how each item in it is useful

  4. Do the following:

    1. Show how to use a signal mirror.

    2. Describe from memory five international ground-to- air signals and tell what they mean.

  5. Explain how to protect yourself against insects, reptiles, and bears.

  6. Show three ways to treat water found in the outdoors to prepare it for drinking.

  7. Show that you know the proper clothing to wear in your area on an overnight in extremely hot weather and extremely cold weather.


Wood Carving

The requirements have been completely revised and read as follows. Some of the previous requirements were retained, but revised slightly or rearranged, and new material was added.

  1. Show that you know first aid for injuries or illnesses that could occur while wood carving, including minor cuts and scratches and splinters.

  2. Do the following:

    1. Earn the Totin' Chip recognition.

    2. Discuss with your merit badge counselor your understanding of the Safety Checklist for Carving.

  3. Do the following:

    1. Explain to your counselor, orally or in writing, the care and use of five types of tools that you may use in a carving project.

    2. Tell your counselor how to care for and use several types of sharpening devices, then demonstrate that you know how to use these devices.

  4. Using a piece of scrap wood or a project on which you are working, show your merit badge counselor that you know how to do the following:

    1. Paring cut

    2. Basic cut and push cut

    3. Score line

    4. Stop cut

  5. Tell why different woods are used for different projects. Explain why you chose the type of wood you did for your projects in requirements 6 and 7.

  6. Plan your own or select a project from this merit badge pamphlet and complete a simple carving in the round.

  7. Complete a simple low-relief OR a chip carving project.


This analysis was prepared as a service to Scouts and Scouters nationwide
Paul S. Wolf
Advancement Webmaster, US Scouting Service Project, Inc.

Printed copies may be freely distributed, so long as the source is acknowledged,
but copying the information to another web site is NOT authorized.


Page updated on: February 11, 2014

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