The Medicrin

Here's a punch line...



                        The Medicrin   



              as recorded by Wayne McCullough   

                 (original Author unknown)   



There  once  was a  medieval  village named  Trinsic.   This   

village   was  being  terrorized  by  a  vile  monster,  the   

Medicrin.   Each night,  the Medicrin would  stalk down from   

the hills, and devour one of the villagers.   



The  terrified villagers  called a  meeting, and  decided to   

pool  their  money together  to  hire the  great  hero Erik.   

<fanfare>   



Erik  came and listened to  the complaints of the villagers.   

He  consulted his  Great Hero's  Book of  Vile Monsters, and   

learned that Medicrins love to eat Loons.   



So  Erik hunted high and low to  find a loon.  He found one,   

captured it, tied it up, and brought it back to the village.   

He then had the villagers dig a deep pit.   



Erik  threw the  loon into  the pit,  hoping to  capture the   

Medicrin, and slay it.   



     That night, the Medicrin came . . .   



          It smelled the loon . . .   



               But  it also smelled DANGER,  and it ran off,   

devouring one of the villagers on the way out.   



After  calming  the  villagers,  the  next  day,  Erik again   

consulted  his  Great  Hero's  Book  of  Vile  Monsters, and   

learned that Medicrins also love sugar.   



So  Erik gathered  up all of  the sugar in  the village, and   

threw  it into the pit.  The loon, not having eaten in days,   

devoured all of the sugar in a single gulp.  Erik was struck   

with  panic, and ran to and fro trying to figure out what to   

do  next, but  night had fallen,  and the  Medicrin would be   

there  soon, so Erik crossed his  fingers, and hoped for the   

best.   



     That night, the Medicrin came . . .   



          It smelled the loon . . .   



               It smelled danger . . .   



                    But  it also smelled  the sugar, and the   

Medicrin  dived into  the pit, and  devoured the  loon.  The   

villagers swarmed over the Medicrin, and slew it.   





          The moral of the story:   



     "A loon full of sugar helps the Medicrin go down."   




Presentation:

The story calls for a narrator, a Hero, a Medicrin, a Loon, and assorted villagers. The narrator should have a loud, clear voice. There should be at least three villagers, but the more, the merrier (up to ten).

The narrator should read the story, and the characters should act out the parts. I personally feel no props should be used, and only the narrator should speak.

The narrator should read the story slowly and dramatically. Purely from the spoken point of view, the only humor in the entire story is the final punch-line. However, minor slapstick should be employed by the actors.

This is amusing mostly because of the punch-line. This story should not be evoked in excess.


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