Volume 6 Issue 7
February 2000

Always Take the High Road. I saw a pocket-size reference from a major St. Louis Employer on this subject.. As adults we all realize what it means when we hear the phrase "Take the High Road." But how many Cub Scouts know what this phrase means? As leaders, we can use this phrase in our meeting to teach the boys. This lesson will take very little time, yet be of lasting impact on the Cubs. Ask your boys "What does taking the high road mean to you Cub Scouts always "Take the High Road.? Have them draw a picture of what it means to them. At a young age Cubs might draw or describe a trip in the mountains or driving on an overpass. "

For the Wolf Leader "Take the High Road" works with introducing Achievement 12. Bears learn a bit leadership skills in Achievement #24e, and what it means to "Take the High Road". Webelos when working to earn their Citizen activity badge reinforce and expand on knowledge and skills learned throughout their Cub Scout careers with the Cub Scout Motto is "Do Your Best", which in a sense is always to "Take the High Road".

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This month's theme is "Cub Grub", and it is a fun theme to work and prepare for with our den. But on a more sobering note there are many children throughout the world who simply won't ever have the opportunity to find out about a food pyramid (daily food requirements), or what "3 square meals" mean since they are starving. About 24,000 people die every day from hunger or hunger-related causes. This is down from 35,000 ten years ago, and 41,000 twenty years ago. Three-fourths of the deaths are children under the age of five. Today 10% of children in developing countries die before the age of five. This is down from 28% fifty years ago.

There is a site http://www.thehungersite.com/ that I encourage you to visit. A click of your mouse will give a donation of food to hungry people of the world from the sponsors of this site. THANK YOU!!!

I have a Leader Idea that originated for me with something I do here at home. We have teenagers (18 & 15) and one thing we can count on is that one of them will always pick up the phone on the first ring--when they are home of course!
We have two phone lines one for real phone calls and the other for our computer. When they are at home, and the computer is not on-line, I will occasionally use our computer line to call our other number. Of course, they pick up the ringing line immediately, I say their name and then say "I love you" say their name again, and then say "Bye". That's all I do, it takes less than a minute , more importantly it also something they enjoy because it is always unexpected and everyone needs to know they are loved.
With a little change in the phrasing you can turn make this a Leader Idea. During your den meeting notice something each Cub Scout does. Call his home sometime later and simply state what you really liked or appreciated that he did during the den meeting. For instance, Jimmy, this is Mrs. R, Just wanted to let you know that you did a great job leading that ceremony, game, song, etc. Then say "Bye". Again this should take about a minute, but it does recognize the Cub Scout in a very positive way.

Materials found in Baloo's Bugle may be used by Scouters for Scouting activities provided that USSSP, Baloo's Bugle and the original contributors are cited as the source of the material.




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