U. S. Scouting Service Project at http://usscouts.org

Cub Scout 75th Anniversary Award
For Cub Scout Leaders

ussspdivnew.gif (3230 bytes)

In 2005, in honor of the 75th Anniversary of the Cub Scouting Program, which began in 1930, BSA developed a set of 75th Anniversary Awards which could be earned by individual Cub Scouts (including Tiger, Wolf, Bear, and Webelos Scouts), Cub Scout Leaders, Families of Cub Scouts, and Cub Scout Packs.  Each award emblem border featured a different color. These awards are no longer available.

This version could be earned by any registered leader who works with Cub Scouts

Requirements

Complete requirement 1 and five other activities.

  1. Participate in a pack, district, or council celebration commemorating the 75th Anniversary of Cub Scouting. (This could be a blue and gold banquet.)
  2. Create posters, fliers, or other media to promote 75th Anniversary celebration events and/or awards at three den, pack, district, or council events.
  3. Serve on a committee in your pack, district, or council to plan an event to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of Cub Scouting (different from activity 1).
  4. Learn about a game that boys played in 1930. Teach the game to Cub Scouts at a den meeting, pack meeting, camp, or district activity, or to a group of leaders at a training event or roundtable.
  5. Using materials that would have been available in 1930, teach a craft to Cub Scouts at a den meeting, pack meeting, camp, or district activity, or to a group of leaders at a training event or roundtable.
  6. Learn a song that was popular in 1930. Teach the song to Cub Scouts at a den meeting, pack meeting, camp, or district activity, or to a group of leaders at a training event or roundtable.
  7. Take photographs or write an article about how your den, pack, district, or council is celebrating the 75th Anniversary of Cub Scouting. Submit to a local newspaper for publication.
  8. Create a costume and wear it to tell a story about the history of Cub Scouting to Cub Scouts at a den meeting, pack meeting, camp, or district activity, or to a group of leaders at a training event or roundtable. (Resources include youth handbooks and Cub Scout Leader Book.)
  9. Invite a career professional (firefighter, police officer, banker, retail professional, etc.) to speak at a Cub Scout activity or training event, highlighting how his/her profession has changed in the past 75 years.
  10. Read Rudyard Kipling’s The Jungle Book to familiarize yourself with the characters Baden-Powell incorporated into Cub Scouting.

Page updated on: May 06, 2015

clear.gif
Materials found at the U. S. Scouting Service Project, Inc. Website 1997-2007 may be reproduced and used locally by Scouting volunteers for training purposes consistent with the programs of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) [Links to BSA Sites] or other Scouting and Guiding Organizations. No material found here may be used or reproduced for electronic redistribution or commercial or other non-Scouting purposes without the express permission of the U. S. Scouting Service Project, Inc. (USSSP) or other copyright holders. USSSP is not affiliated with BSA and does not speak on behalf of BSA. Opinions expressed on these web pages are those of the web authors.

The U.S. Scouting Service Project is maintained by the Project Team. Look at our Web Stats. Please use one of our Contact Forms to communicate with us. All holdings subject to this Disclaimer. The USSSP is Proud to be hosted by Data393.com.

 

 
SUPPORT
THIS
WEBSITE

Support the US Scouting Service Project Websites with your donation. With your help we can continue to serve the Scouting Community.
The US Scouting Service Project, Inc. is a Not-for Profit Corporation chartered in the State of Missouri. The IRS has not recognized the USSSP as a 501(c)(3) organization, so donations may not be tax deductible.

To donate, click on the icon below.

Visit Our Trading Post